Standup Comedy Interview Bobby Slayton “The Pitbull of Comedy”

Amazing interview with one of the Best….Bobby Slayton, Headlining comic for over 4 decades, he also was in movies like “Get Shorty”, “Dreamgirls” and played Joey Bishop in a Rat Pack Movie. Very funny and a bit abrasive….enjoy this interview and comedy set. Hosted by R. Scott Edwards

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Podcast Transcript:

Announcer: 

This is another episode of stand up comedy, your host and emcee, celebrating 40 plus years on the fringe of show business, stories, interviews and comedy sets from the famous and not so famous. Here’s your host and emcee Scott and words.

Scott Edwards: 

Hey, welcome to this week’s show. We have some fun in store for you, ladies and gentlemen. It’s the pitbull of comedy and a good old friend in the business. Let’s hear for Bobby Slayton.

Bobby Slayton: 

Okay, first of all, when you used to emcee the shows 20 3040 Or was it 50 years ago at laughs unlimited. Back then even though you’re an amateur, you give me better introductions, you think by now if the 30 is a practicing, I’m not saying you have to be Johnny Carson, or even Jimmy Kimmel and Jimmy Fallon. But you would say God, will you be able to go, you know, we were doing the show for a while, you know, he has another comic has no friend of mine. He’s, you know, you give some credits. He’s been in all these movies like bandits and Dream Girls. He’s one of the top companies out of San Francisco. Okay, even though you shouldn’t let me do my own introduction, because that’s one of the things but you don’t have to talk to the next hour. But that’s one of the things. You know, it’s funny, because when you told me to do the podcast, my lesson limited, and I really thought about it when you call me yesterday, you know, reminiscing and nice stories about the old days is nothing I could think of nice to say about you or that club, or soccer bat. But I would make shit up now. I’m going to make stuff up. And then you said to me, okay, you said, well, we’ll take we’ll take like an hour. And then I’ll cut out all the funny stuff. Would you make fun of me? You didn’t say that. But, but now that I know, you’re gonna cut out everything to make you look good, nice. Look still, but it doesn’t matter what I say really?

Scott Edwards: 

Well, it’s nice. You’re going into this with the right attitude.

Bobby Slayton: 

Like, the ultra wide, you know, and by the way, and you said to me, Look, I’m doing a podcast you and 80 million other people. And then he said to me, you know, we have a couple of 1000. Listeners, just because you have a couple of 1000 people who have taken interest doesn’t mean any of them are listening. But I do want to say hello. I want to say hello to 2000 imaginary listeners. And since you have only 2000 imaginary listeners, why don’t we just say to your million imaginary listeners? Well, I’d like to say hello. And thank you for having me on the show. That boosts my ego a little bit. Thank

Scott Edwards: 

you. Yeah.

Bobby Slayton: 

And then you said to me, I don’t mention a President Reagan, a President Nixon, or anything, because people are gonna think this thing is all don’t mention the COVID thing. Don’t make sure man on the moon. Don’t make anything that’s happened in the past. So you can play this crap for many years to come and nobody will know when it took place.

Scott Edwards: 

Well, that’s not really the point. I just want to celebrate comedy. It was something that was a big part of my life. I know, it’s been a big part of yours. And it’s just nice to talk to people. And

Bobby Slayton: 

also for both of us. Forget it move on. Holy shit really want to dwell on this comedy crap, you know? And let me tell you something else, cowboy. You know, it’s funny, because I used to love to do stand up comedy. When I told you that there was sick of it. It’s because I hate people so much. Now, it used to be nice with what’s going on in the world. And it doesn’t matter what’s going on now. We’re not going to mention, you know, or the zombie apocalypse when they when they when they got the cure for COVID. At the zombies came back. And the nuclear war we’re not going to mention North Korea blowing up, you know, half the country. We’re not gonna mention anything in the past. We’re gonna continue on, like things are just normal.

Scott Edwards: 

But let’s let’s go to the beginning. How did you just a short version, how did you end up a comic?

Bobby Slayton: 

But really, that’s the best you could come up with. Okay, really?

Scott Edwards: 

How did you end up working?

Bobby Slayton: 

Wait, let’s back up before I forget more important than hold that thought and that question, which I’ll be happy to answer. Okay. So when you call me yesterday, and you told me be doing this podcast. Now, that was the first time I’ve heard from you and how many years? How many years? 30. You think 30 years? Yes. Well, what did we also limited close in Sacramento.

Scott Edwards: 

It’s still open. Well, but But you told it.

Bobby Slayton: 

I mean, what did you get out of it?

Scott Edwards: 

I sold it and semi retired in 2001.

Bobby Slayton: 

Okay, so Okay, so, so. Yeah, so yeah, I didn’t talk to you while it was still over, because I went over to play the punch line, which I want to tell you about. He’s so mad at me for that, aren’t you?

Scott Edwards: 

Oh, no, no, no, you were a regular, very important headliner to the club in the 80s. And then towards the mid 80s. You got that contract offer from the punch line and we lost. Right? No, we totally understood we weren’t upset about it. We business’s business. And then you went on to

Bobby Slayton: 

write it’s like the mafia. It’s just business. You know, it’s business. But you know, you got to remember something though. Back then. There were a lot of comics. And you probably know this. That just assholes who, you know, I was is one of these guys who was loyal to a club. Like when, when Denver comedy works, which is still there. I remember the the improv with it. And I’d been working in pubs all over the country. But I worked for Wendy for so long. And I said, You know what, I’m not going to go work for these other people. But there were comics, and we jumped ship for like, $100 a week, $200 a week. And I said, Well, how can you do that with somebody, you know, taking care of you pay your bills, you know, put you up in a nice hotel or condo. So I never wanted to do that. But with Bill Graham, like you said, you know, and it was no pressure. But when he came in, it wasn’t built personally. But I’ve been working to punch out at San Francisco. And I’ve been doing concerts, some avid working, you know, Walnut Creek in the Bay Area. So I had to do it. I’m glad you understood. My point was up. But no,

Scott Edwards: 

I just said, Yeah, of course.

Bobby Slayton: 

But he okay. He hears me when you call me and you said you started this podcast. You’ve done about 25 bucks. And I said, so. You don’t call me. Okay. You had 25 podcasts. I’m sure there was another 25 comics that you tried to get ahold of. You couldn’t find. Didn’t this year call another? Another? 25. Scott? They were fucking dead. So you probably went to 75. Guys by the time you got debate.

Scott Edwards: 

Oh, no, that’s not what happened.

Bobby Slayton: 

The first 25 podcasts, I wouldn’t know what comics you got to hold them. They were more important to me. Because I helped make that club. I love that club. I love laughs from limited, not us so much less limited.

Scott Edwards: 

Well, you were an important part of the growth in the early 80s. And you and I don’t remember because I’m you and I are the same age but you might have a better memory. That what year you started but I think was about 8182

Bobby Slayton: 

Well, wait, wait, wait, no, no. Okay, cuz I remember a lot of stuff that was like you I don’t remember. What What year did you open the club? In old sack?

Scott Edwards: 

We’re just about to hit the anniversary August of 1980. Okay,

Bobby Slayton: 

I started to extend them comedy. Me and Dana Carvey started the same night at only cities. And I don’t know what happened to Dana Carvey he fell off. He fell off the face of the earth. But I get played on the funny bones and above the dead. He just disappeared. He did the church lady number two heard from him again. But I’m pretty sure David and I went on the first night. Same night, first time. And then you know, that was in 1976 77. Wow, I actually checked with data on that, but and then I didn’t do it for years. So I started like really started 77 Because most comics always say you don’t count your first year, because you just dabbling and do it a few open mics. So I got up on stage when I was 21. So that was 1976. So I officially started 77. So I was there. We opened up the original club in old sack which is down in the basement. Bill Hicks opened up for me, I think twice there.

Scott Edwards: 

Yeah, that the we were in the basement of the Delta Queen restaurant in a little room right about 100 people. And I had a black curtain up and a small riser. It was I remember, well, I was just starting.

Bobby Slayton: 

Now then when you move to the nicer room. Wasn’t that still an adult the queen but just upstairs?

Scott Edwards: 

No, it was actually in the alley across the street. And that was the club that I really felt the most love for because I got to design the room. We were in a basement and comedy feel low ceiling, you know the fake brick wall.

Bobby Slayton: 

I remember and you were collecting animation cells, you put some of them on the walls that was at Club, right? Yes. Right. And then when you move down to the burbs, that was the big club. You finally got all the kinks worked out. And you know, cuz you know when you’re going to club it. I’ve never opened the club. But you go okay, well, that’s what we got to do next time is what we got to fix this time. And you know, of course more and more money, but you don’t want to make the same mistakes twice. You know, and and grow. Right? So you learn and you grow. I’ll tell you one thing I do remember which I hated. You were the house MC and you were really good at it. But then you got kind of cocky if you’re okay. You gotta you kind of felt you were a comic. Scott Stewart another extra five now. Really? Just when you think you’re coming on stage. Hey, where are you from? Hey, you know, you know, I just had a baby and another 10 minutes. Holy shit. Go take a leak and go out smoke a cigarette? Can anybody ever buy a new car? Oh, fuck. There’s another 15 minutes. I gotta go. Yeah, and then and then I can then I go on stage. You know, look, we have a second show. You only have 12 minutes to an hour. But Scott Edwards show me

Scott Edwards: 

writing but I never thought of myself as a comic. But I did enjoy nobody.

Bobby Slayton: 

By the way. Nobody else did either. Nobody else like well, it was quite clear.

Scott Edwards: 

It was a fun time though. I mean, I will always appreciate the relationships I built and The whole comedy scene was so new and, and I you started you had already been in it three years, but I was at 24 Just getting into it, and by the seat of my pants and making lots of mistakes, but you had Bill Hicks open for you a couple times.

Bobby Slayton: 

Why Bill hit me a few times when he was like a teenager. You him and Dave Chappelle when they were teenagers. That’s why I mean, Chappelle, you know, I remember, it’s 1718 That guy was great. And no comics is good at 1718 No comic, very few comics, even comics. It’s 17 or 18. But, um, but Hicks. He was probably by bed in his early 20s. I don’t remember. But I do know we played for you. The week that John Belushi died because we were sharing the comedy condo. Yeah, so whenever John test away, me and Hicks went back to the condo. I think we bought dabbling in drugs at the time, maybe like shooting heroin. Blow and I think he was getting into hallucinogenics for both smoking pot and drinking, that’s for sure. We went back to the Gardo. And you know, we sort of Volusia died. We didn’t know Belushi. But, you know, I mean, we kind of shoot most of this up. And I was

Scott Edwards: 

still to comedy into the to all of us that were in the industry and knew those talents. But I mean, there was, I mean, to me, it was just as big a loss when we lost Eric’s I mean, there’s been a number of people that have been lost over the last. I mean, like you said, it’s been 30 years since you and I have actually been in the same room together. And there’s been so many changes, but that’s one of the things that I think I wanted to ask you about is that you have a different style of comedy a little harsher little harder hitting, I always found it very entertaining. Mike crowds always enjoyed it. But not all, most of us. But I think that we presented you in the right light in in in our club was the right kind of atmosphere. I mean, I can’t imagine you going into one of those discos turn comedy clubs or some restaurant that threw a riser up in the corner and said, Hey, here’s your headliner. You know, laughs was at least a comedy club there for comedy.

Bobby Slayton: 

Look, I’ve been doing this as long or longer than anybody, you know, around there be you know, and there have been a lot of those risers in the corner, disco, cooperate, parties, many of them have got great, and some of them have gone horribly awry. And some of them, they’ve been so many of them. And, you know, my style of comedy. You know, the thing is, now what’s funny is that now, I’m not really working. And after all the me to movement of Black Lives Matter, people became so uptight. People became very uptight. And I mean, and it’s not all a deservedly so, but it’s people have got you know, it’s too much out people’s got too upset. To sense about stuff when it comes to comedy. Not say that upset about what, you know, sexual harassment, and the cops. I just say, but the comics are comics and we’re here to make fun of people. And you know, when you can’t say this, you can’t do that at Trader Joe’s have to change your labels. And Jemima has gone and, you know, Mr. Clean is too gay. And, you know, Oh, shut up already. Okay. Jimmy Kimmel did blackface 30 years ago already, he needs to apologize for the written letter to Alright, okay, I get it. But you know, it’s comedy. And I’ve always been one, you know, when I started doing it when I became a comic when you asked me earlier when I became a comic, when I started doing it. 2122 I never really knew about money, Bruce, and people will tell you like a young lady Bruce. And when I started watching Babe Ruth, even though it’s nothing like Lady rose, you know, I started reading those books. watching and listening to stuff. Aguilar got to drop that joke when he boosted that Joker look, hey, at least I’m following these footsteps. And, and people like George Carlin and and all these comics, you know, we’re getting crap. You know, the Smothers Brothers who I grew up with, who became good friends, but we’re getting crap. You know, they were censored and blackballed during the Nixon administration, struggle, you know what, this is good. And, and when I started doing stand up in San Francisco, the point I was making was that there was like a black comedy night in Oakland, and they can make fun of Whitey, and it was a gay comedy night. It’s a gay club, and it makes fun of straight people. And so don’t tell me that I can’t make fun of you, you know, on women and minorities, blacks, minorities and gays. But now people are so sensitive. And again, I understand that, but you know, I started attacking back you’re gonna make fun of me. I’m gonna make fun of you. You know.

Scott Edwards: 

And so we should explain I don’t mean to interrupt, but we should explain to the listeners that maybe haven’t seen your set. We’re going to fix that later in the show. But we have had people say that you were similar to a young Don Rickles or Sam Kinison. I think Lenny Bruce has a good connection. And it is interesting because that style of insult humor and what was great about you, Bobby and I think that’s why it worked for Don Rickles as well. Is that your non partisan I mean, it’s everybody, you know,

Bobby Slayton: 

I hate everybody has a different view. But what I have to say is more important, okay. I love records and I knew records over the years. And he was a real sweetheart of a guy. I gave him a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Montreal Comedy Festival 1015 years ago. And, and he and his manager said to me, do not use any four letter words when you are, you know, done doesn’t like that. And so he was very clean, and he made fun of everybody. And my stuff was more hard hitting. But he was kind of a role model for me

Scott Edwards: 

when you’re going after every section of life evenly, you know, and I think that’s what made it okay. With at least my audiences is it wasn’t like some comics where you focus in on one type of person or one subject, it’s everything. And when you come across like you and Don Rickles hitting everything, you really shouldn’t get offended. But it’s interesting that you mentioned how sensitive people are today. Because I don’t know if people like you and Don Rickles and others would have this success in this day and age then we had in the 80s and 90s. I mean, it’s really changed. I mean, I was I would pick on people as an emcee. I mean, it was just part of the pattern, right? It was it was

Bobby Slayton: 

the other thing too about wrinkles. If Don was around now, I wish it was around. His comedy was so not a brace of really, but typical black guy goes, Hey, you guys, hold on. If he did that now, even though he’s a rookie, I think you get these younger millennial douchebags, you know, these vegan ponytail scholar. upset, you know, so, you know, the bottom line is that I am now 65 years old, and I am sick and tired of stand up comedy. You know,

Scott Edwards: 

it’s a road roads hard.

Bobby Slayton: 

Well, you know, you know, I look, the road is hard. But when you get guys like Jerry Seinfeld, or you get guys like, the great Bill Burr, who you get whatever you get guys to So slide for his class of flying private planes, getting your $1,000 to a million dollars at night. And, you know, staying at a suite at the Ritz Carlton and then going the next day, you know, everybody’s coming to see that when you play in a comedy club. You know, like last I’ve limited which back in the day was a great club. But, you know, you played a comedy club and you stayed in a Hampton Inn lock. There’s so many people that have been out of work for years. We started with the COVID thing and unemployment, and I felt so horrible for my friends that went out of business and restaurants. I’m not complaining. But I’m sad that life on the road making, you know, whatever. And with idiots having to get up in the morning to do morning radio, and it gets grueling. Well, I love morning radio. I was one of the guys. Look, you know, I was one of the comics, who always like you said to be let’s do the podcast what time you want to do it. What night? No, no, no, no, no, no. What night? No, no, no. before five o’clock, I’ve opened up a bottle of wine. I’m cooking dinner for my girlfriend. And I’m in bed watching TV by eight or nine, asleep by 10. And walking the dog at 7am I love that. You know, when my daughter was born, you know, I was on the road so much that when I was home, I make sure to make her lunch or go to school every morning at 7am You know, and I would walk the dog and I would you know you have to catch a plane and you have to do morning radio. I’m used to getting up six, seven in the morning. I’m an old Jew now. But I was always an old Jew. I was always on the same schedule. And I love it. We should know this night I stayed up till 11 o’clock. You know binge watching and to be binge watching is making it through one episode of subjects. Well, it was binge watch your show. I go, what’s your four or five? Four or five? Are you Are you crazy, but make it through one.

Scott Edwards: 

You know what we should we should take this moment to bring up two things. First off, you have a very successful daughter Natasha is a very successful actress out there. And so whatever you did worked, and she’s a great gal, and then the other as you mentioned doing the radio promo shows. And one of the reasons I reached out to you is that your name came up is one of the favorite guests for Paul and Phil. On Why 92 I had him in here for an interview. And we were talking about the various comics that would come out on the show. And Paul Robins and Phil Cowen, go, Oh, our favorite by far. Bobby Slayton, that guy

Bobby Slayton: 

loved those guys. You know, those are the guys like brother wheeze in Rochester. You know, like Paul, young Ron in Florida, like their guidance is Alex but in San Francisco, I believe it does it guys, so many great, great shows that I love doing. And, you know, and morning radio to me, always a treat, because we you know, and I would always plan out my stuff. A lot of comedians would go on you that they weren’t funny, you know, I would go on. The night before I did my show, I went out to dinner. And I wrote out all these jokes. And we love and I just got to Lamont Pinelli in San Francisco, one of my favorites of the last five years, but I can’t sit here make sure that radio show. But those guys in Sacramento were great. And I would love to go in the morning. And a lot of radio shows were framed out beyond because my show, you know the F BB and whatever I would say on stage, but I never maybe once or twice in 30 years would let a word slip you know is you have to the seven second delay.

Scott Edwards: 

Well, you’re you’re a professional Bobby, you knew the difference, but I wouldn’t

Bobby Slayton: 

plan out and stuff. And that’s why those guys like me. You know, look, it doesn’t do any good. Because I always asked the morning shows I go. So what comments have yada recently that sucked and they told me these comments. It doesn’t do you any good as a club owner or the radio station to wake up at six in the morning after work and then go on the radio and just answer questions with one word answer. So I get a couple comments. Okay, but Craig, me on the show you’d like me to Sacramento? Yeah. Okay. It’s great. Okay, that’s not putting any asses in the seats at night. What do you wake up in the morning for and doing radio, if you’re not going to be funny, but you got it

Scott Edwards: 

up thought I was just giving you a compliment that you got that it was marketing and business. And it’s all part of making the show and the club’s success word. It’s a symbiotic relationship, how well the comic does also details how good the club does. And that’s why you were one of our great headliners is that you always drew people and you drew people because you got up did morning radio and kicked ass on stage.

Bobby Slayton: 

Well, you know, the other thing I think also is back then you booked somebody grabbing comics, like people looking forward to seeing me. I wasn’t really good. Good. Mediocre garbage, I thought was a good topic. But you know what it is also is that you know, you do the radio, and is really helpful. But then on the other hand, I can’t tell you how many people will come to the show. Now. Not a lot. But they get offended. Go. Well, I heard about the radio this morning was it is dirty. I still been at City Hall last week. That’s where we came to see him. He did the same material. I did six minutes on our city. Oh, I just did an hour. I used it an hour. And you get those idiots. You can’t make them happy. You will get people in the front row. Who you know I pick to talk to who gets so offended. I didn’t get the show to be picked out I gave as my wife’s anniversary. And then sometimes it’d be signing CDs after the show. And people come up to me. I stood in line for an hour to get front row feature to say a word to me. That’s all we gave you I could I can’t win. You know, you just can’t win.

Scott Edwards: 

Oh, that’s funny, but that I’m sure that happened. We all the

Bobby Slayton: 

time. All the time, Scotty all the time. Well, we

Scott Edwards: 

had because you came early on in the laughs career I think we were able to showcase you for the audience that wanted to see that kind of humor and see who you were and how you presented things. I mean, when did you pick up the nickname Pitbull of comedy? I don’t remember that. I knew we started using

Bobby Slayton: 

from Alex Bennett. Alex said it in the 80s who was one of the first guys to do morning radio. I went on his show. Alex Bennett was already a legend. Even Howard Stern grew up listening to Howard when I was when I was a kid listening to him when he moved to San Francisco was on cameo. I went in to tell him what a fan I was. And I went on the radio and that’s when he said you know any other comedians and I was the guy that brought in Kevin Pollak and Robert Williams did it Carvey and then comedy and radio became a very symbiotic thing I’m not saying to be an ALEC started it but it was kind of the beginning of it would have happened anyway without me and Alex, but they were two other radio stations bring on comics every morning and do it every day. And we you know anybody had a live studio audience? Nobody did this before Alex was that

Scott Edwards: 

I was just gonna agree and say that one of the reasons that the club got off to a quick start is I was able to get in with that timber door and other DJs on if you remember because I think you did that as well ks app radio real early on before they booted us all out. It was. It was great.

Bobby Slayton: 

Yeah, it was still a friend of mine. He was on After Alex are on in the afternoon he’d have comedians on but have been Alex kind of started get that whole thing. But But I was on your show one time that this other Pitbull of comedy started. It was in the 80s with pitbulls were in the news all the time. And they were eating the children. And the mailman would deliver the mail or chew the mailman handoff, pupils. Pupils had a bad reputation. And they weren’t bad dogs, but people, you know, train them to be, you know, monsters. So you always get this impression about pitbulls who really are the nicest dogs when treated correctly. So I was on this show one time. And I was making fun of McDonald’s. You know, every comic before the McDonald’s? Who knows what the joke was beggar? What do you what do you put what are the chicken mcnuggets made up? I don’t know, you know? Whatever the joke was, it was it. It was an innocuous joke on the radio, you know, and I guess McDonald’s were sponsors. And so one of the ad guys kept running into the studio, you’ll just watch there’s a $50,000 account. And Alex goes, you know, you’re like a pit bull we, we put you on the show to plug your gig and you bite the hand that feeds you is what the whole thing was, like the pit bull of comedy. So So back then it became the pit bull and I I didn’t have a lot of TV credits back then. So when I did my first, my only young comedian special back in the 80s, John Larroquette. Robert wall, great comedian, in his own right, had written an intro for me, and I didn’t like it was really stupid. And he was like, Give me something I’ll just use. They call him the pitbull of comedy. So John Larroquette goes, they called the pitfall of comedy. So when I would play a club, they will use that. And you know, over the years, you’ve seen him on The Tonight Show. You’ve seen him on Comedy tonight, direct from Joan Rivers show. Back then, if you want to be Johnny Carson Show or make me laugh. You really have any credit. So I became the pitbull of comedy, you know, and I still use it. And every time I play a club, they go, you’d like to do deduction. I go, No, I gotta think it’s up. Now. It’s just I took it off my website, but he just never saw him and other people would have been a bulldog. No, it’s pitiful. It’s that’s what I met. Whatever. I pulled out drive the jowls of the yellow crab dripping out of my eyes. Really? Really, they couldn’t even. Wally what?

Scott Edwards: 

Now you were working for us really steady. And then the contract came up with the punch line. You remember what year that was? I think it was 88 Oh, God,

Bobby Slayton: 

no. Well, whatever the punch line opened in Sacramento, that’s the information you should have.

Scott Edwards: 

Oh, I probably should. So I remember it being in the late 80s. And that worked out. Now that you worked a lot for them, then that paid off for you. Right? Financially, when you

Bobby Slayton: 

say paid off. Look, they opened the beautiful club in Sacramento. They’re still there, by the way. And, you know, they didn’t say I couldn’t work for you. But uh, you know, I couldn’t saturate the market. They said, You need to keep, you know, six months apart. But they will give me a couple of times here in Sacramento. They were booked to be at that time, I think three or four times, that’s unimaginable bow. Because most comedy, there’s so many comedians, so many comedy, that nobody plays these clubs more than once a year. You know, how do you play a champion Cisco, which? Well, I

Scott Edwards: 

was I was a little different. I would like to bring guys in three or four times in a year, every maybe quarter because it built a reputation. And I did when they opened I did have a good relationship with Booker. I can’t recall her name out of San Francisco for the punch line. But we worked on who was going to work where when, and it was never an angry situation. I will say that I did run into Bill Graham once at a concert and introduce myself and when he found out I own laughs unlimited. He was not happy and gave me a few harsh words. But

Bobby Slayton: 

seriously, that doesn’t sound like Bill really.

Scott Edwards: 

He felt I was stepping on his he thought he was kind of the entertainment guru of Northern California. And I had had a little bit of success with the club. And I I don’t know I mean, it wasn’t a big deal. I was nothing to him. But it was interesting that he even knew who I was, was surprised me. You know,

Bobby Slayton: 

you know what Bill Graham was a very good friend of mine. And I loved him so much but I have heard stories about if if you’re incompetent issue with him. I could see what he would have you to the house for Passover dinner. I get it.

Scott Edwards: 

Yeah. And it wasn’t it wasn’t I’m sure it’s something that he didn’t remember 10 minutes later, but it was a short interaction. I just thought it was funny. Cuz I was a young kid that he felt any sort of threat to him who’s this monster of entertainment that I, I looked up to I thought he was a, an entertainment. Producer God, you know, I mean, he was doing everything he

Bobby Slayton: 

was he kind of started that whole business. But you were there first, but he probably didn’t know that, you know, but whatever. It’s one or the breaks. But, but yes, I start working with a bunch of them. And they gave me a couple of times a year. And then even though San Francisco was in Sacramento, you know, Tommy T, had all his clubs in Pleasanton and San Ramon, and in all of these Bay, which is, you know, an hour from you guys. 90 minutes, maybe. And so I would play for and it was full bars. And then there was the punch on Walnut Creek. The I mean, I was in the Bay Area, Northern California. And then there was Caesars Tahoe and a comedy club, you know, John Fox, and then I opened up to bands and Harry’s, you know, so it’d be just in Northern California. I had, you know, oh my god. 1015 weeks? Minimum, no more 20 weeks a year? Well, you

Scott Edwards: 

know, you were a bit of a celebrity in Northern California. I mean, everybody felt

Bobby Slayton: 

I was a bit of a celebrity. Am i i could have been a contender. I could. Somebody. No, I meant doing. Now you know what I’m doing. I’m sitting in my house. I will have lunch so I could talk to you. I’m gonna go. I plan to build plants. I’m going to go principal recipes and my boxing. I want to make it my girlfriend for dinner, and go swimming in my pool. That’s my wife now. Picture about it.

Scott Edwards: 

No, no, it sounds like a good life. And so let’s transition because you went from being a celebrity of Stand Up Comedy in Northern California. And you left laughs and you had a career doing other clubs for the 90s but you also transitioned into an actor. I mean, you did the Rat Pack. Movie, bandits? I heard you even did a voice on Family Guy. One of my favorites was you’re in the movie Get Shorty and had a scene with Travolta because yeah, I mean

Bobby Slayton: 

you know what, it’s all minor stuff really. But people think it’s really cool. So yeah, what 43 times who’s a good friend and a great guy. By the way, you should I have nothing to plug but anybody’s listening you should we Woody Allen’s a new autobiography apropos of nothing. I guess what a horrible human being. His ex wife Leah Pharrell is what a piece of shit is in Iran and Pharaoh is that what he did nothing wrong. That’s my opinion. So

Scott Edwards: 

you have to read the book, but I’ve always got it was railroaded. like

Bobby Slayton: 

there’s no tomorrow horrible human beings of people. But anyway, more importantly, free. I may get to a lot of cool people. You know, what company Allen, for any actor is a greatest thing ever, you know?

Scott Edwards: 

And director.

Bobby Slayton: 

Yeah. And we’re both genius. Looking at it, his first album on the wall of my office, when I did it to Woody Allen did a TV show called crisis in 60s for Amazon Prime. It didn’t get great reviews, but he put Louis black in it. Judy Gold. They were terrific. A late mate from Nichols in May, you know came out of retirement to play his wife, Miley Cyrus, and then it got horrible reviews, but it was really pretty funny. So when I went to do it, I had a copy of Woody Allen’s first album, and I said keeps you excited. Thank you, Bobby. For what a book with a comedy genius.

Scott Edwards: 

Oh, that’s awesome. That’s, that’s a great story. And was it interesting or just a job working with people like Travolta and you work with some other big stars and bandits with these?

Bobby Slayton: 

Job? It’s very exciting. You know, I have friends like Kevin power to that 100 movies. You know, might not be as excited. For me. It’s always exciting work with these people. You know, Bruce Willis, Billy Bob Floyd and Cate Blanchett. We had a couple of scenes of bandits, which is a movie that nobody saw. It came out the week of 911 so I could see what people were preoccupied. But that was great. Dream Girls didn’t see what you know. Eddie Murphy, Jamie Foxx a quick fade but it was great. You know, it’s made you feel like you’re in showbiz where you

Scott Edwards: 

were and you were out there and you’ve done a lot of TV you you did these movies you had a really strong 40 plus year career in comedy, but I do have to ask was being on Family Guy a highlight you What did you love Family Guy? I just I just think it’s a quirky funny cartoon and I know a lot of I love family guy would have dropped and Bruce bomb was on it. I mean, you know,

Bobby Slayton: 

I know. Well, let let me tell you what happened with family Guy cuz I played an Indian chief which probably would be a no go now have a white Jew play it in the head of a casino a Native American, but it’s very funny story actually would family guy you know, before it came on the air, I was doing a lot of voiceover work I’m not doing like voiceover work now dude. Great commercial Skechers no favorite shoe company Skechers they make the best shoes. And you can throw them in the wash, and they’re great. And they got a memory foam don’t cut this out, because I gotta send this to Skechers. Anyway, I got a whole bunch of new spots coming out to them. But I used to do a lot of radio spots and a lot of not a lot of voiceover stuff. But, but, you know, some animation. So I was working a lot the cloud was the year the Family Guy came out whatever it was, you know, at least by about 30 years ago, by now, almost. My daughter was little, let’s say 20 About 30 years ago, whatever. So I was on the road and I come home by pack I had to go back on the road, I come home, I walk the dog. I’m exhausted. And rarely do I get sick and I come down with a really bad cold. And the next day is pouring rain. I think I have to leave to go back on the road to some fuckin funny boat it devoid or somewhere now looking forward to attack and attack. So I get a call from my voiceover agent. He goes Listen, is there any way tomorrow you can come in and read for this new animated show? And I said, Well, I’m leaving, like four o’clock in the afternoon. I got a flight. Feeling well, here’s what they’ll bring in the morning. They really you know, this guy said that Pharrell. It really wants to see you. I got no, I had no idea who this guy was. I go, you know, and I’ve read through so many of these cartoons. I’ve never got any of them. I go every once in a while. I go look, you know, I’ve never passed that anything. But I’m so exhausted. And I’m working a password on it. So he called me back. He does set the alarm and wants to know, if we call you in like an hour. Will you do it over the phone? We will send you the sides. I had a fax machine back that I fax me the sides or whatever. So I read them. I couldn’t give a shit if I got this at night because I knew I would I get the part. Okay, it’s won. The NBA cheat when it was called whatever the my big episode was called first season, like the fourth or fifth episode. So I go in the studio, I go to my club, funny boarded the void, whatever. Come back, go into studio. And it’s me. It’s Seth MacFarlane. And he’s doing you know, little Stewie. His voice is doing the father and whoever’s doing the dog. For us a lot of this is a stupidest piece of shit. This shows on TV. This is so stupid. I bought a vision quest idea, the chief and you have to go in the woods, or whatever. I mean, I’m very professional, very nice people. I don’t think this shows going anywhere. So it goes on the air. And I watch one episode and I go Alright, whatever it is. Chuck Liddell. Watch the next episode. Pretty funny. But pretty funny show. watch another episode ago. I don’t think I watched it until everybody started saying how great Family Guy was I start watching it go. Holy shit. This is brilliant. I watch is brilliant. And actually, the father was a billionaire. And I’m doing your stupid fucking podcast for your imaginary listeners. And nobody cares.

Scott Edwards: 

Well, it’s nice to put it all in.

Bobby Slayton: 

Between me I checked it

Scott Edwards: 

it’s just a small bridge. Oh, that’s so funny. Well,

Bobby Slayton: 

I love your show so far, isn’t nearly as entertaining as me.

Scott Edwards: 

Well, nobody is as entertaining as you. But I we’ve had Mark shift on we’ve had very good conduct Larry Wilson, comment magician who was very entertaining on the show. And the guys Paul and Phil. But it’s a growing thing. It’s it’s getting there. But I told you

Bobby Slayton: 

it was gonna be up to 20 episodes. Your fucking mother who’s on the show?

Scott Edwards: 

Well, there’s a wide variety of entertainment, mostly comics that were regulars at the club in the well. They’re all comics that were regulars in the 80s and 90s. At the Club,

Bobby Slayton: 

anybody’s successful. Well,

Scott Edwards: 

yeah. Timber or Jeff Jenna, Mark Schiff, Bruce, bomb

Bobby Slayton: 

writers, any headliners.

Scott Edwards: 

You’re it Bobby, you’re all I could get. You know what we should do is let the audience hear some of your comedy.

Bobby Slayton: 

Can you do that after I hang up the phone because I don’t want to have to listen to any of the shit. Okay, well, I want nothing to play. I think it’s CD Baby, or Amazon or somewhere, my CDs are available or they can download or buy shit. And you don’t funny. Some of it you could not do anymore. It’d be shocking. And it’s not a bit shocking. It’s all something to play with the radio, most of it. And some of it is so old school that there was so many guys like the great Dilbert like Dave Chappelle. There are guys out there now, the stuff they’re doing is so much more out there. So some of the stuff, he was very tame in comparison. I mean, some of it is outdated. You know, like Little Richard, I was an originator. I was, I was the architect, the architect the comedy, you know. And, by the way, you know, you mentioned Sam, Kevin said earlier, I was doing this 10 years before him. I always hate when people compare me to Andrew Dice Clay, who was a character,

Scott Edwards: 

you know, he there’s no, there’s like,

Bobby Slayton: 

a bruise, or, or every Dice Clay and I’m not putting them in the same category, or subcategory none of us are like, with totally different people. They are not politically correct. Did you say the upward? So you all the same category,

Scott Edwards: 

shall we? Yeah, we had lots of actions, the F bomb, that’s not a big deal. That’s it was the style, the machine gun rapid, you know, thinking and sharing a material. That was funny. And you mentioned a couple times old stuff. And I think, and one of the reasons I’m doing this podcast, and I could totally be wrong, Bobby. But I think funny is funny. Right? In other words, if if, if a joke or material worked in the 80s, and it was truly funny, it’s going to work now, you know, I recently played a bit by Larry Miller, that is at least 40 years old. And and to me, it’s as funny as that first time I heard it,

Bobby Slayton: 

you know, but you are wrong. Because I let me use an example is the great Lenny Bruce, a lot of his stuff, which is dated, a lot of it was at the Tiber is funny. Even the great Marx Brothers who I love with a passion God, you’ll watch a lot of stuff today do okay, it’s all dated, you know, a lot of stuff. Still, the Lucy show. Still very funny, very entertaining, but a lot of it is dated a lot of those sitcom. It’s funny, but you know, they’re not funny, like Seinfeld is funny. A lot of it’s dated a lot of it’s what you grew up with to a lot of it. There’s a lot of factors involved. But if you listen, when Bruce was one of my heroes, a lot of people well, that’s not why is this funny? You know, a lot of it is, is is a product of its time,

Scott Edwards: 

you know, it is more difficult for politically edged comics, you know, Bill Maher, or will Durst or Lenny Bruce is going to have trouble being as funny maybe five, 510 minutes after their material, but I mean, you know, years after, whereas I think material like yours, transcends time. Yes. Just like I do. Yeah. Yeah, you know, I’m trying really hard to compliment you. And I know that it’s going over like a lead balloon. But I do think of you is one of the great headliners and helped make my club a success. And that

Bobby Slayton: 

shut up. Ready. I played the punch, right? You’d never came by to say hello.

Scott Edwards: 

I’ve never been in the punch line. Why? I just I don’t know. I mean, I’ve been to the improv, of course in the store and most of the clubs in LA, excuse me in the Bay Area. But the punch line, I’ve been to the punch line in the city, but the one here

Bobby Slayton: 

don’t say you still live in the Sacramento area, right? Yeah. Oh, yeah. You’ve never gotten to the punch line to see somebody?

Scott Edwards: 

No, no, it’s just been something that I’ve never seen. I mean, once you get out of the business, I mean, I was on the production side, I’m not saying it correctly. I produce the shows. And so, and I never thought of myself as an entertainer. So after 21 years of doing comedy, you know, six nights a week, you know, you’ve kind of been there done that there was no need to go see it. I don’t know if I would think

Bobby Slayton: 

you’d want to go. Well, let me see what the competition let me just go see the club. My old friend Bobby Slayton, let me say hello to somebody.

Scott Edwards: 

Well, you know, maybe there was a little bit of jealousy or competition in me that led me not to do that.

Bobby Slayton: 

That’s exactly what it is. You’re an angry, jealous, shallow man. And I’m glad to see that. I feel like this start up. I’m going to recognize that now. And you’re growing as a person and getting out of that.

Scott Edwards: 

Oh, you you’re helping me thank you so much, Bobby, you’re giving me a reason to move forward.

Bobby Slayton: 

Why even if you didn’t want to go to brunch I think you just drive by and throw eggs at the window go. Fuck you to stick your tongue out. Get back at him somehow.

Scott Edwards: 

What you know ring the doorbell we’re

Bobby Slayton: 

going away after 10 years I’m ready guy.

Scott Edwards: 

Exactly. Do something. Well, let’s let’s wrap this up. Now you’ve been I saw you still appearing in Vegas recently. I know. You said you’re semi retired, but you’re still out there.

Bobby Slayton: 

Done. Done. I’m never gonna go back to Vegas. I mean, you know what somebody calls me. You know, somebody give me a call, you know, ask your bill Barr took me to Hawaii, there’s a big shows every year. But that done was scaled up. But if I never have to do it again, it’s okay. I don’t really miss it.

Scott Edwards: 

When you know, there’s a career, I would call it a basic career, but I

Bobby Slayton: 

made a living. And I hadn’t made a living, I worked my ass off. I was in the trenches. You know, like one of the crime families, I never made it the other boss that I was a captain, you know, I, you know, I moved from the soldier to Captain never made it other books. Certainly never read one of the five families, you know, of comedy,

Scott Edwards: 

and you could disagree with me. But I feel that both of us at our tender young age, were blessed to be able to, as you put it, make a living doing something we really loved. I mean, I never, I never

Bobby Slayton: 

got like a little, I never got my Shirley Temple movie really, really?

Scott Edwards: 

Well, I’m just saying I never got rich and famous. But I’ll never regret the the years I had in comedy. I loved it and still do. And that’s

Bobby Slayton: 

famous either. And you want to know something I right now, and it could change tomorrow. Because I can have a stroke or a heart attack or my house could burn down deliver the heroin. But it could be an earthquake or a flood, or a COVID or whatever was coming back whatever’s going on out there. But for now, I wake up every day I go have a nice house. My daughter’s healthy, I got a great girlfriend, she lives five minutes from me, I have a perfect life. I live in a house by myself, a nice house, not a great big house. Nice little house with a nice little swimming pool, and a nice little kitchen and a nice little gym. And instead of drums or soundproof room, with my ex wife’s face on the drum head that I hit. But everything is fine for now. I have too many friends, like you said that have died. And you know, you’ve got Facebook, there are too many people out there to go into operation. And the older you get the more people at a diet and what people get distracted to go. And it’s very cliche, but you know, like my girlfriend said, You’ve got to be thankful for what we got. Exactly. You know, I don’t even know the show is brought me down tremendously, and reminded me the horrible old days. I can hang out with Scott Edwards.

Scott Edwards: 

I’m glad we put some purpose to the moment. Hey, Bobby, it is always nice to reminisce with somebody that you remember and have fond memories and care about and it was great work. Yeah, few back in the day. And I appreciate you taking the time to do this show with me. And I think you’ll be surprised. At least two or three people were hear it and appreciate what you had to share.

Bobby Slayton: 

First of all, we never really did talk about laughs unlimited. I thought that was the whole idea.

Scott Edwards: 

No, no, no, it was about comedy. And you did mention laughs and you enjoyed working there. And that was what’s important to me is that you had good memories of working for me because I certainly have good memories of you working for me sounds.

Bobby Slayton: 

Yeah, well, you know, let’s talk again another 130 years. Let’s catch up again in the next podcast. Well, I don’t know. Yeah, give anybody lined up to do your next podcast. Oh, get lined up.

Scott Edwards: 

We’re doing a special anniversary version with my remember my partner Bob Stoneburner. And then his sister who used to emcee and manage some of the clubs. Lynn stone.

Bobby Slayton: 

Gonna ask you about those two. What are those guys do it?

Scott Edwards: 

Bob’s mucky muck with the railings, Bellaire grocery store chain and Lynn Stoneburner is still doing a little bit of entertainment here and there works out of her home and they’re both very funny people and still a big part of my life.

Bobby Slayton: 

I like them both a lot more than you I was hoping that I could. I was hoping you’d come on like the old days. I do 10 minutes of your shitty jokes and to bring on Bob and Lynn to host a show that would that would have really brought back the old days.

Scott Edwards: 

Well then that

Bobby Slayton: 

you used to come on stage you see come on like in your bathrobe, but that on Saturday night you put on a jacket

Scott Edwards: 

why? Come on like

Bobby Slayton: 

you do your gardening whatever you do, you just you leave the office you’d come on stage just like a slump. But that every Saturday night if you put out a jacket and tie it by right

Scott Edwards: 

I went through a couple different phases. I was dressed up in a suit for many years and there was many years I was just an a Hawaiian shirt. I don’t remember like overalls but yeah, it was went from dressing

Bobby Slayton: 

to comedy. I still have it me. I still got it. I still got it down.

Scott Edwards: 

You’re hilarious. Hilarious. Okay,

Bobby Slayton: 

wait, did you say Bruce Bob did the show? You haven’t had Bruce pop yet?

Scott Edwards: 

He hasn’t been recorded yet, but he’s all set up. Yeah, we’re gonna be doing him. You want me to mention something?

Bobby Slayton: 

Yeah tell him to stop doing my material. Baby man was always my that was my dad he stole

Scott Edwards: 

Yeah, I will I will

Bobby Slayton: 

call I gonna call Bruce and Taylor. I’ve been talking to him for a while but I sobered up from all the time. It’s a good friend.

Scott Edwards: 

He is a good guy. But so are you. Thanks for doing this Bobby and we appreciate you taking the time out of your special retirement day.

Bobby Slayton: 

Okay, but let me tell you one more thing. If you get a cut out anything, anything at all, one word from this interview, make sure it’s you don’t get anything I said.

Scott Edwards: 

Okay, you got it. Okay. All right. Thanks for doing this, everybody. All right, everybody. Thanks for listening the podcast. Bobby Slayton, the pitbull of comedy and look there he goes. He’s already got. Well that was great having Bobby on the show. But right now we want to showcase some of his material as we talked about. He does have a different style. I think you’ll enjoy it. So here’s a set that was recorded live at laughs unlimited. In the mid 80s. Ladies and gentlemen, Bobby Slayton on stage

Bobby Slayton: 

you guys up Sacramento with the police department. You guys have that minority hotel, Sir Not a women in the police department gaze on the police department. All that bullshit. You got that? You got that? I don’t care if every cops of black Filipino lesbian. I mean, it doesn’t make any difference. As long as they can do the job. In San Francisco. You have to hire women in the police department blacks in the police department gays on the police department. Yeah, gay cop. I guess we get busted by gay cop. He was a handcuffs. You know, it’s like, it’s like the fire department. I get a lot of he has a great story. You guys appreciate this. Last night, we get these angry lesbians sitting up front. Like there’s any other kind. Oh, like there’s happy lesbians. They’re all miserable. Anyway, no, I’m not even sure that they were lesbians. not positive. But this one woman has this underarm hair. It’s like macaroni. No, I thought it was like she had it. And she had a plant. And she’s like, What a perriers. Like one of the plants are in the show. Anyway, I’m doing this show. And he’s like, show you what they’re like. And I mean, if you haven’t seen lesbians, you know what they’re like the real feminist lesbians, which is feminist lesbian, sexual, radical Nazi. So instead, make sure during the show did you tip the waitresses and this one woman goes, they’re not waitresses, the weight persons. I said they got pitched the waitresses. They had debts. They be waiters. They had to take them to be really fat waiters. I didn’t say that I should have been anyway, from talking to these women. And so what they do for a living, and this woman goes I live in San Francisco. I’m a firefighter. I said this great. You’re a lady fireman? No, not a five minute. I’m a firefighter. Firefighter lady. Fine. And what the hell is the difference? Woman gets up. She stormed out of the club. She’s about five feet tall. Now I’m not saying women shouldn’t be on the fire department. But woman can do a job. Give her the job. All right, but when a woman’s five feet tall, I’m going to fire only guys like Rambo with an accident. Oh my god, it’s gonna huff and puff blow down the door. For me my Sony Trinitron and the one on your walk down the ladder. I don’t need to look like like with asbestos Birkenstocks. Don’t touch me, sister. My house guy right here. And on your way out the door. Put up the toilet seat. I don’t know. You mentioned he mentioned Tony. A Mexican. Tony is an Italian now you’re not Mexican. You weren’t mentioned. Mexican. That’s great. Could you people stay together. Don’t try to like inbreed with us. Mexico is a fine country. You ever go to Mexico, I’ve never been to Mexico. I was down there last month. My girlfriend once you can’t go once you see the ancient Mayan ruins. And she goes into my into my moments. And wherever ancient Mayan ruins and Shimamura which is going to big black man the Bible was the big light made made out of stone that’s here. We went to the engine major Monroe. They also have the ancient Mayan ruins we didn’t get to see those are both equally as impressive. Jemima was a brilliant let’s build the actual models and then the action mind was the most real cool. But it’s amazing to see Mexicans and Americans different, you know, because you’re Mexican. You’re American got a lot to be proud of. But in Mexico, these people, you know, he got a national debt now about $96 billion. What do we just do this last month? We lent them another 5 billion like they’re ever gonna pay us back. Like his people are ever gonna pay us back. They’re never gonna pay us back. But so you make fun Mexico In Mexico, one of the Mexican Stadium in Yarra Don’t make fun of this country. It’s a different culture than America. I see Palestine a different culture. It’s the same culture we have only we had it about 5000 years ago. We’ve learned how to make roads, which is a little bit higher on the food chain. And you can’t even come back into United States without going through this agricultural inspection until the release forms really bullshit and actually says on the immigration forms. Are you bringing back more than $200 worth of merchandise? Now, I don’t think in the entire country in Mexico, there’s $200. So you’re very pretty. You’re young Mexican woman. Now why is it? No, it’s maybe you guys know. Why is it that every old Mexican woman you see is fat. But every young Mexican woman is skinny? Yeah, the old Mexican women. It’s just what happened?

Scott Edwards: 

Well, he certainly has a different type of comedy. I hope you enjoyed that. Thanks again for listening. Thanks to Bobby Slayton for doing the interview and sharing some of the comedy that we had back from the 80s. Hope you’re enjoying our podcast series. Be sure to listen, share and rate if you get a chance. We’ll see you next week for another great show. Bye.

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