Queen of Komödie, from Germany – Lois Bromfield

Yes, all the way from her Home in Hochstadt Germany, Lois Bromfield talks with me about her career, comedy, Writing for TV, and moving overseas. Lois was one of the funniest comediennes  back in the 80’s, working the road until she became one of the writers for the Rosanne TV Show. She went on to write for several other shows, so now listen to a terrific interview and comedy set with Lois Bromfield…enjoy!

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Podcast Transcript:

Announcer: 

This is another episode of stand up comedy, your host and emcee, celebrating 40 plus years on the fringe of show business, stories, interviews and comedy sets from the famous and not so famous. Here’s your host and emcee Scott and words.

Scott Edwards: 

Hey, welcome to this week’s show. I got something kind of unique and different for you an interview with one of the loveliest and funniest comedians in the business, and calling all the way from Nuremberg, Germany. Let’s hear it for Lois Bromfield. Lois, welcome to the podcast. It’s so great to hear your voice. It’s been. We were just talking about it. It’s been a little over 30 years, but I feel like we’ve always been friends. We had a lot of fun together. Yeah, it’s

Lois Bromfield: 

been a it’s been a really long time. And I’m really old. Sorry, you’re right. We’re old. Well,

Scott Edwards: 

I try not to make it here in

Lois Bromfield: 

Sacramento. We’re so far. It’s like a nine hour time difference. It’s the other side of the world

Scott Edwards: 

where you’ve been in Germany for a number of years now. Right?

Lois Bromfield: 

have lived here for 10 years. 19 years, I still haven’t learned German. It’s the worst language. It’s so hard to learn. I’ve learned I’ve learned some of it. But most people speak English because they’re smart. Yeah, you know what it’s about living here. It’s great. And we live in a small town. But I always go to London and I go to Berlin and I perform a comedy club there. And it’s really fun. And the London comedy clubs are the best. And Berlin is pretty good. But you know, they are German. So always the best audience.

Scott Edwards: 

Yeah, there’s always fun German. It’s always been a debate if there’s a sense of humor in Germany, but you know what, I want to hear about that. But let’s I’m gonna take you back a few years, just for my podcast audience. We worked together for over 10 years back in the 80s and early 90s, before he became a big TV show, writer and producer, but be for that. Share with us. Just a short story how you ended up in comedy because being a female comic on the road has got to be one of the toughest jobs out there. When did you decide to get into comedy?

Lois Bromfield: 

I don’t remember. I mean, I was young. I was in New York City when I was 2019 20, which New York and worked at the Improv and then I came out to California. And you know what the honestly, I didn’t really want to be a road comic. That wasn’t like just the whole idea of that I hated what was great about working to your club was, it wasn’t a road gig, because I only had to drive from LA to Europe to Sacramento, which was like five hours. So a real gift to me was having to get on a train or fly somewhere or do some big long, hauling like just two or three days somewhere or, or going all the way down to Atlanta, Georgia, or going someplace where you’re so far from home. That just makes you feel you just feel like you feel like a hooker you know, your club was great, because I only had to it was short, like almost like just going home. It didn’t feel bad. So I go to your club. I can’t remember if you put us up in a hotel or in a condominium. I don’t remember now.

Scott Edwards: 

It makes up a bit. We had an apartment for a few years. We had a house for a few years. Some of the special acts got a hotel. But what was now just to give them a little background, your you were born Canadian. Correct.

Lois Bromfield: 

I was born in Canada and I came to the States illegally. I actually came to the States when I was 20. went to New York. So then I got a Social Security. That was the best part. I go and I just told them I was from Iowa. They just believe me, give me a social security number. I’ve had it ever since. And then I went to went to California and I met Steve we got married to him. And we got married. I got my green card. And then we stayed married for 15 years.

Scott Edwards: 

We should mention everybody

Lois Bromfield: 

1998 became a citizen.

Scott Edwards: 

We should mention to everybody that she’s referencing our husband, Steve Moore, who was a very funny comic, he worked. laughs unlimited several times. And in fact, you guys used to come up together kind of as a team and work together and we want to say something nice. Not only was he your husband back in the 80s to help you become a citizen, but sadly, we lost him in 2014. But he was a really terrific guy and a good comic. And I think it’s nice that we at least get a chance to mention that Steve Moore

Lois Bromfield: 

Yeah, thanks. I appreciate that. He was a really good guy. He was my good friend for so long. And he just did he just was a warrior. Like he just did anything if like they were gonna go, we’re gonna get on the train. We’re gonna go to Atlanta for it’s gonna take like two days. He would just do it. He didn’t. He just was a really open sweet man. And when we when I lost him, I just, I cried for a week. I mean, it was just, I was so sad and even now I think we’re how’s it How’s it possible he was gone? He was 59 years old.

Scott Edwards: 

You know, and you’re just too young to be HIV positive .

Lois Bromfield: 

That was a long time because he had it for 20 years. And losing him was terrible. I lost a lot of friends this past five years, because people are getting older. You know, I’m 65. And my friends are all in their 60s and so

Scott Edwards: 

well, but we want to make it clear to everybody that you really were. You are a beautiful woman, you were one of the best looking gals on the road. And I heard you recently describe yourself as the Doris Day if she was a biker, which is so funny, if a long time but if you’re over, yeah, but if you’re over 50 know who Doris right how I

Lois Bromfield: 

looked at my hair was crazy. I was out of my mind, I’ve been telling my mind is different. It’s a little more palatable now. But then it was really I was just I was just off the charts. I didn’t have any boundaries, didn’t have any control. Sort of like just they just did anything said anything. And when I looked at my stand up, now, I think, holy crap, what was I doing? Because now I don’t talk I don’t talk about stuff I talk about now is about being gay or being in a relationship and getting older. And so totally different subjects. You

Scott Edwards: 

know, well, that’s what happens with age and experience. But in, in your case, you you said it was it was off the charts. We actually I was telling you before we started recording, you were always fun. And I think that not only did that make it enjoyable to share time together on at the club, and even away from the club. But I think the audience picked up on that, that you had a fun loose, kind of wild side. You were pretty and you were funny. I mean, Lois, you’re a funny gal. And that came that came across on stage. And that’s really, what made you a success. We always enjoyed having you at the club in and you did some of our biggest shows you did one of our New Year’s shows. I mean, you were you were one of the best.

Lois Bromfield: 

Thank you. That’s really nice. I remember that. I remember all of that. I mean, I remember it being fun. And Steve and I had we always had fun with you. He always let us drink a lot. drank a lot. We did. We drank a lot. It was funny, because I heard that drink at all. Now, I mean, I have one glass of wine and I go to sleep at like 10. So it’s not the wild day that kind of over but I remember your clubs really well. I remember exactly what it looks like in the stage. And the people it was good audio. The audiences were good. Really good. Although New Year’s was always a hard leaders is a hard gig anywhere. It is. Because people get so blasted so but yeah, I think your club at least two dozen times in the US I lived there ever, maybe a dozen times.

Scott Edwards: 

Oh, it was it was quite a bit lowest because as I said you were one of our favorites now. Not only. So you did a lot of road comedy at that time. You were cruising around doing different clubs. How did you become a comic?

Lois Bromfield: 

Oh, I don’t know. I mean, I just was living in Canada and I was my family’s basically, family’s pretty showbusiness oriented. My brother was a director and my sister became an actress and my parents worked for the government. Go figure how that works. But I don’t know, we just sort of I think it was we just decided to get the show business and leave home to get away from my father. He was so terrible. I think we all just tried to find a way to get out of the house. And that was the best way and plus, we were all funny. I mean, my sister was really funny and my brother brilliantly funny people. And so we just found humor as a way to survive. And then to leave home fast and and, you know, for me it was that was this is all I wanted to do faster. So I figured this could maybe be a career and then I definitely did like every other person stand up. I think it’s the same story. Well, survival thing I think I think people do it to, to survive something, whatever it is, whatever, whatever. For me, it was just fun. And I loved it. And I when I perform now, which I don’t do very often. I can’t tell you how great it is. When you get older, it is just better. It’s better. People People look at you differently. You know, cuz you’re not your books don’t distract people from it. So they just listened to you. And the audiences are different. When you’re older, the better.

Scott Edwards: 

Well, I’m I’m glad that you’re enjoying that. Now. You you when you said you escaped Canada and your father, you went to New York and you hit Dangerfields and the Improv there. You did some showcasing and then do you remember what year you came out to California

Lois Bromfield: 

I came to California in 1980. As a matter of fact, it was Christmas night at 80. I came to see my sister I had no intention of staying. I was going to come back to New York. But then I went to the Comedy Store and I fell in love with the Comedy Store and with every single thing about Los Angeles and I just stayed I never I never went back to New York until 2001 I was actually after 911 I went back to New York 2002 A long time.

Scott Edwards: 

Yeah, did you you must do made friends with Mitzi and I’m sure she had I appreciated your comedy and worked through a lot.

Lois Bromfield: 

Yeah, of course, she made my career. Without her, I wouldn’t have done a stand up at all, I would have done nothing. I don’t know what I would have done, I would, it would have been hard to have gotten my foot in the door. So she was she, you know, gave me the opportunity to work on the stage every night and, and I worked there a lot every night, almost every single night. And then people like you made it possible because it was a road gig that was close. And it was easy to do. It gave you an experience outside of the city. So I got to leave the safety net of LA and the LA clubs and go somewhere else. And your club was great that way. The famous, there was clips in San Francisco. I did. But you know, I couldn’t tell you San Francisco. I just never I never connected there. I don’t know why I never connected with people in San Francisco. The audience has never, never ever. And for some reason with you, I did it in Sacramento, I had a really good time. But I mean, San Francisco is so close to you, but for some reason, it’s just a different, different deal.

Scott Edwards: 

Well, we ended up being really good friends. And not only did we lose do a lot of activities away from the club, but I even watched your dogs for a while. If you remember that. Yeah, yeah, they were at my house for I don’t know, six months. You are in transition. And I had your dogs for a while. We but we used to do a lot of things. Do you remember I? We opened the club in 1980. You came out to LA in 1980. I know you came to work for me pretty early. Now. I’m the same age as us. I don’t remember the exact year or date. But do you remember coming up in how you got work at Laughs Unlimited?

Lois Bromfield: 

I don’t remember. No, I don’t remember that. I remember the first we were just instant friends. I know I don’t remember how you found me or I found you. I have no clue. I might have emailed this. I might have called or I don’t know, I have no idea.

Scott Edwards: 

Well, I was I was going to LA a lot and showcasing acts at the store and the improv. I may have seen you in one of the shows and approached you but I didn’t have a memory of that. And I was wondering if you did not a big deal.

Lois Bromfield: 

No, I don’t remember I just remember the first time I came there and I remember how we how I found your you found me. So I just remember it being a fun gig. That was easy. And this is what I loved. And I don’t know how road comics. I personally hated the road. So I maybe did I can tell you that not a close maybe for clubs in the punch line and Atlanta, your club, and maybe to others. I can’t even think of that right now. But yeah, I hardly ever do the road. I hated it. And I would say to my agent, I don’t want to do the road, I want to do television. The road is a slow way to get known I wanted to television, you know and then and then he gave me television jobs. But after a while I sort of said I don’t even want to do stand up. I’d rather do ride rather write and make more money and and, and not have to go on the roads.

Scott Edwards: 

Well, you were you were it’s it’s interesting that you say that because as I mentioned, you are one of the funniest headliners and always seem to have such a great time on stage. But it is a tough life and the fact that you have a show business family and you wanted to get into that. And the good news was by the late 80s, early 90s, you were writing for television a lot. We do want to share with the audience that you were one of the lead writers on the Roseanne show, correct.

Lois Bromfield: 

I wasn’t a lead writer. I was one of the writers. But I was one of the writers. I was on the show from 1991 to 1995 44 to three and a half seasons. And that launched my career as a writer. And so then I did other shows tons of them after that Gryffindor fire and then Amy Sherman who I don’t know if you know who Amy Sherman is she she’s doing a show called The marvelous Mrs. Maisel.

Scott Edwards: 

I know, I know who she is amazing.

Lois Bromfield: 

Amazon Prime is so good. And she started on Roseanne, and she became a huge, hugely successful writer. And now she’s won three Emmys for this show. And I got to work with her. I mean, I got to work with great people coming up the ranks in Roseanne and, and all the shows I worked on. For februari 15 years, I worked as a TV writer and then and now I wrote a book by the way.

Scott Edwards: 

Oh yeah, we’ll have to tell the audience about the book before we leave television writing in laughs unlimited. Let’s let’s just close that up with a quick story. When you were working laughs It wasn’t just that we had fun at the clubs, but I don’t know if we remember but we went gambling once in Tahoe. We went to the gay bar faces and went dancing one night. We used to do a lot of fun things.

Lois Bromfield: 

I don’t remember the gambling at all. I don’t remember that. Want to go I have no recollection of that. That’s awful. I don’t I don’t remember that because I did that a lot. Almost everywhere I went so I don’t remember specifically doing that but I’m sure Yeah, I’m sure I was. I loved gambling so I’m sure we went gambling like crazy.

Scott Edwards: 

Well, I the point I wanted to get across on the podcast was that we felt lucky to have you as one of our entertainers because you always throw the audience’s you’re always fun on and offstage. And we felt a friendship with you that we didn’t have with all the acts in that we were doing fun things away from the club, because we enjoyed hanging out together. And it was just nice to have you in. We wanted to say thanks for those years of great comedy and being part of the growth of laughs unlimited.

Lois Bromfield: 

That’s really really, really nicely to say. And that’s really sweet and really kind and, you know, it’s funny, because so many years later, I didn’t know that’s how you felt that’s really huge. Well, lowest thing to say it is it’s just really

Scott Edwards: 

well, we had a lot of pain in the ass. No,

Lois Bromfield: 

I was young and a pain in the ass and running around like a lunatic and drinking and completely out of control. So to hear that is really a surprise. That’s nice. That’s nice to hear. I had no clue. That’s how I was perceived.

Scott Edwards: 

Oh, yeah, you were we still talk about our some of our favorite headliners and your names always in the mix, Lois. And it’s so great to be able to catch up after all these years and have a conversation like this. So let’s take it back to Hollywood, you were writing for the Roseanne show. Now I noticed that they made you producer on five of those shows. I’m not as familiar with television, I’ve always been on the fringe of show business. What’s it? What’s it mean? That you are a writer and a producer of a particular episode? Is it just mean more pay? Or did you actually do more work? How’s that work?

Lois Bromfield: 

You just there’s a bunch of writers, you know, so you get assigned a script and you go on to write it, maybe you co write it with somebody else. Sometimes you generate the story, and somebody else writes it. It depends a group effort, you know, it’s all done by committee writing. And then you go often, you get the credit either for the story, or you get the credit for the writing. Okay, I wrote a lot of episodes, but I co wrote with people and producer means like, there’s just different levels of pay. That’s all it is. So when you start off as a staff writer, you know, you’re getting a certain amount of money, then as you move up to producer, co producer, supervising and then co executive and he gets you know, gets great as you start making more dough, and you start getting less sleep and he get fatter.

Scott Edwards: 

Well, it’s it’s important to make a living, and it is great that you are finding ways to make more money at the time. Now what that also lead to, and I thought this was interesting is that you actually made appearances on Hollywood Squares, which had to be one of the most fun shows to be on, and also on Match Game. And I’m sure that was from the connections you made at Roseanne. But what was it like being on those kind of game shows with all those celebrities? Yeah, that was before

Lois Bromfield: 

Roseanne? Oh, that was the Match Game of those children in the 80s. Wow, after Roseanne afterwards, and I didn’t do anything any stand up. I did stand up rarely, but I didn’t do any television. Stand up at all. So I maybe did one show did Arsenio Hall once, but those shows were way before that ever in the 80s. Really? Yeah, those were in the match game with like, 1983 84. And all those shows, I did all the silly little shows I did. Were 80s. Yeah. And 8586. Maybe.

Scott Edwards: 

But well, that had to be a lot of fun though. It’s just

Lois Bromfield: 

within. Once you become a TV writer, you’re just getting TV writing jobs and doesn’t really lead to much else because because you’re writing you know, they don’t see you visible. And the only time I really got any connections was when when I appeared on the show, because she would make every writer do a spot on the show. On one episode. So I did two episodes that I’ve had a very small part. And then you get stuck. They do want to come up with you on TV. You want to come to our club, and I go no, no, I can’t. I’m working 130 hours a week. Dear club, too tired. But yeah, I’ve been working as a television writer was huge. It was it was a huge privilege. I loved it. I really did. I really loved it. So this is why I think Roseanne a lot because she without her. I don’t think I would have had a big writing career. This really a big break to get on her show the beginning.

Scott Edwards: 

Well, it was a number one rated show. So

Lois Bromfield: 

yeah, it was huge. It was a great show. And the writing was great. I was really lucky to learn that way.

Scott Edwards: 

Well, I think it’s interesting because you’re the first one I’ve talked to that was made kind of got your start as a stand up comic and transition to television writer. And you didn’t do a lot of stand up during those years. But you’re doing some stand up now. So how much of a hiatus of actual stage work was there? Or did you always keep your toes in the water?

Lois Bromfield: 

Yeah, I always get my chosen water a little bit. But when I came here, I, when I came to live come to live in Germany, I figured it was never going to be doing stand up anywhere because where was I going to do it? I couldn’t do it here. Then I started to discover after a couple of years, that there’s amazing clubs. So there’s a club in Berlin called the Quach comedy club. It’s really big. And they’re, they’re everywhere there. There’s about five different clubs up in northern part of Germany, and then into the Netherlands and Belgium. And then the biggest discovery was in London, I went to London. And I said, this guy that I knew my CVS told him what I did all my stand up from a long time ago, and Munich, and he wrote back, we fucking love you to come here. So I go to London, I go, like, literally like two days later, I go to London, and I gotta tell you, man, this club, you would love this club. This club was so great. It’s just packed to people. Everybody’s got huge amounts of beer in front of them. Nobody’s belligerent. Nobody’s. Nobody’s yelling at you. They’re just fucking laughing. They’re just laughing. They’re just attentive and smart and laughing. And they’re young. And they’re great. The room holds about 400 people in a room. And so that’s when I started to think you know what all you got to do stand up while I’m living here. Because why not? Well, so I’ve been doing that maybe, maybe three times a year, I go to London. And then maybe once a year, I go to Berlin, or once a year to Munich,

Scott Edwards: 

you had a really, you had a really terrific fun set back in the 80s. Did you have to have your old material refresh? Did you write new material? Did you even remember your old sets from the 80s?

Lois Bromfield: 

I didn’t do anything. The stuff I’m doing here is not even nothing like what I did at the 80s. Now I let go of all that, because I was saying I was straight member I had to catch I had a boyfriend. I could never say I was gay. I’ve worked anywhere I could have worked for you. But the audience would have the audience’s just didn’t they didn’t receive it. Well, I don’t know if you remember that. But anytime that I’m even Stevie when he was there, he was pretty obviously a gay guy. And I think a lot of people didn’t like it, because they kind of looked at the guys gave him a hard time. The audience sometimes gave him a hard time. But, you know, it wasn’t really the warm reception for gay people to do to come out of the closet on stage and say they’re gay. And for me, it wouldn’t have never, it would never have worked. So wasn’t until I got older until I got here that I could go on. I didn’t come out of the closet on my on my act until I came here. So I was in my late 50s.

Scott Edwards: 

Wow. Yeah, well, I see I didn’t live that lifestyle. And I booked a lot of gay entertainers. And it didn’t mean anything to me. funny is funny. And I didn’t allow or notice anything at my clubs. That might have been impolite to an entertainer for any reason whether they looked a different way, had a different sexual orientation, whatever. We didn’t allow that kind of stuff in here in California, it is better than it might be in other states, at least back in the 80s. But it’s interesting that you felt that way. Because we and it’s true. I don’t remember that ever being a part of your act. But it wasn’t a secret, either, at least as far as we knew.

Lois Bromfield: 

No, I never made it a part of my, in the book I talked about in my book, I talked about how hard it was because she couldn’t, because she just wouldn’t get work anymore. And I certainly I wouldn’t have. And so for me to say I was gay, especially on television. I told my agent once I was going to come out, I came out on their Arsenio Hall show the audience booed me. I mean, no, they, they freaked out, they really just flipped out. They booed me. Yeah,

Scott Edwards: 

that’s, that’s unbelievable.

Lois Bromfield: 

So this is kind of have to go through how am I going to work. And so if you want to keep working if to just trigger I had to figure out I did gay clubs. When my did my big video. My story goes from hell video. I got to do gay clubs. And that was great that I could say anything, but I had to I had to do both. I had to sort of ride both sides of the fence. I had to do the stand up and say I was straight and married or not married or bow data or whatever. And then the other side, I could say I had a girlfriend

Scott Edwards: 

yeah, that’s that. That would be challenging. And we should mention that was one of your PhD resist owns the sorority girls from Hell is a famous lowest Bromfield bit. It’s actually already appeared on this podcast in an earlier show, I believe from that New Year’s show. But anyway, it was one of the funniest bits and then when you did the video, it’s it’s been seen millions of times it is a great, great bit, but I know that you’d move on from that doesn’t ever appear in your recent club visits, right?

Lois Bromfield: 

No, I tried it a few times. But it doesn’t doesn’t do well here. It does. It does really well in the state. People kind of get it more because nobody knows what a sorority does. already houses here. They didn’t understand it as well. But I do. I did totally different material. Now I talk about other stuff. So, and I talked to the audience that I talk, you know, I don’t it’s way more relaxed and less crazy. Still, it gets dirty. But it’s good dirty. It’s it’s smart, dirty, as opposed to just gratuitously dirty. But the audience’s here are really good. I mean, they’re great.

Scott Edwards: 

They’re all that’s fine. Now tell us about your book.

Lois Bromfield: 

Okay, so the book is called my dirty life in comedy. And it’s, it’s really sort of takes from from the time I left New York City and came to LA, until I left in 2001, right after 911. That’s the span of time it covers, but it’s really, I’ve chosen very particular stories to tell really, really important timeframes. To know when I got there and, and the show the show they did and then with the shore and, and going on the road and not running out of money in the IRS chasing me and all my girlfriends breaking up with me and just what it starts off, it’s just like one disaster after another, but it’s really funny. Really, really funny, working on Roseanne and working on TV shows and making money and, and, and people, all kinds of stuff. I mean, things that happened to me and Ellie wouldn’t believe I have a whole chapter on how many times I had to poop outside in California because everybody sits outside and I don’t know if you realize that, you know that in LA people are so people have all kinds of problems with their stomach indigestion and so neurotic that they end up shitting everywhere in the city.

Scott Edwards: 

I don’t think I was quite aware of it. I haven’t lived there. So

Lois Bromfield: 

I mean, in Sacramento, I think people are more civilized. But there I heard stories, endless stories. But people who’d have gotten sick on the street or that have diarrhea, so we’re excited to get an audition. I mean, it’s it’s like unbelievable mystery. To me, the book is about every single thing and that’s why it’s called my dirty life in comedy but guys who came on to me and famous and famous actors that have a have a whole thing on Warren Beatty. How he followed me around Keller he followed me around LA for like two hours when after that, and just crazy shit like that. But it’s really funny. And so is the book is pretty gritty. At the minute I get I’m gonna do an audio book on Audible. But I’m also going to get some books printed and I’ll send you one. I’d love for you to read it.

Scott Edwards: 

Oh, I would love to read it as well. Now is it available to the public yet Is it is it out?

Lois Bromfield: 

It’s not out yet because of the pandemic. I couldn’t record it. I was supposed to record it this month. In Frankfort. I was gonna go we have a really nice studio there. But I can’t do it because nobody can go anywhere. You have a lockdown here so.

Scott Edwards: 

So it’ll be an after Christmas. So it’ll be out sometime in January. Well, I’ll let you know. Yeah, I would love to. I would love to have a copy and also an audio book done by you. And just knowing your personality. I think that would be the way to go. That would be terrific. So ladies and gentlemen, keep an eye out. For my dirty life in comedy will be available everywhere because Lois is such a big star.

Lois Bromfield: 

Forever a huge star. Huge. Dog is wondering why the hell I haven’t walked in yet.

Scott Edwards: 

Well, Lois, thanks so much for

Lois Bromfield: 

what I did I just the dog mom now that’s it.

Scott Edwards: 

It’s so funny. Well, you’ve had a great career. Starting off as a talented comedian, working couple of the biggest clubs in the US converting to a producer and television writer for television, that makes sense television writing for television, I sound like a genius. And and then moving to Germany, which was had to have been a big transition for you. And yet still being able to find your route and comedy. I think that you should be very proud of all you’ve accomplished. Thank you.

Lois Bromfield: 

Yeah, it’s pretty, it’s a it was a huge change. I come back to the States a few times there a couple times a year. But right now I’m not coming back because I can’t. But it’s, it’s been a big transition. And it’s amazing. If you ever come to Europe, you come and visit us, we’ll take care of you.

Scott Edwards: 

Sounds good. And when you next time, if you come out to the West Coast, let us know we would love to hook up. We’re going to be spending lots of time in LA and we’d love to see you. Thanks so much for doing this podcast and sharing your story. We’ll make sure that your book my dirty life and comedy is out there for all to hear and pick up again. Thanks for all those years of great comedy and in our friendship.

Lois Bromfield: 

Thanks for making it so much fun. And thanks for being one of the one of the nation’s club owners ever. Really lucky to have you because some of them were not so great, but you were one of the best ones. So

Scott Edwards: 

we’ll tell you what, I’m gonna end this podcast with a little bit of Stand Up material by you and give the audience they’ve heard you before an earlier podcast, but we’re gonna give them another test. So lowest stay tuned just for a minute, but I do want to tell the podcast audience we have a great set coming up from Lois Bromfield. Thank you so much Lois, for being a part of the podcast. And ladies and gentlemen, here she is. Lois Bromfield. Thanks Lois, for doing this

Lois Bromfield: 

for some reason now, I’m Canadian, first of all, many Canadians. Okay. Great. I gotta tell you, truthfully, and honestly, this outfit I got in Beverly Hills, I stole it. And because God knows you can’t afford that stuff on history. I love shopping in Beverly Hills because the people there are so real and down to earth. And they are they’re great. I love shopping in the real expensive stores because they play music that makes you buy stuff you know, you don’t want to buy anything you walk in, you’re kind of depressed you kind of got your Gemco card. Those are hard to get. And you’re really feeling bad and all of a sudden you hear that music data data. Dun dun dun. After about 10 minutes going Hey, okay. 80 bucks. I’m a jerk. Yeah, let’s go walking over stuff you don’t want you know, I get real mad to it. sighs that was a real stupid signs and change rooms. Like I went into the store the other day and have this big, huge sign and I said please do not remove your undergarments, please. Romain like one day a woman came into the shop real suspicious looking like your undergarments a lethal weapon right? When we get to the shop real suspicious looking glasses a trench coat goes into the change of what’s the sign last takes up a trench coat takes up her glasses takes off her undergarment comes in oka everybody stand back I’m taking these jeans with me quite honestly, you know I’ve turned 30 In April it’s a devastating age you know? It really is because when you turn 30 They say that you start to reach your sexual peak now. I don’t know who they are but I’m going to hurt them when I find them. And it scares me too because while you’re reaching your sexual peak your car insurance goes down okay and I think that may be a little dangerous so yeah, I mean Friday Saturday night feeling a little on edge go to a bar pick somebody up high schools to find guys and their sexual peak instead of like you can’t be thinking this happened to me I was having dinner I didn’t eat much so my stomach was kind of empty you know and know that attractive sound your stomach makes Miss empty that kind of we’re sitting in the car a couple hours later we’re driving all the sudden my son goes come on let’s go people Come on stop I see a place It was horrible. He pushed out a block from my house and didn’t have a relationship but I didn’t care because I was near food now. That’s all it mattered. But you know that great feeling when you finally get home and you can finally be a pig be yourself right you go into your bedroom he had changed into your eating clothes via that shirt with the food on it then like a real lady go into the kitchen on hinge your jaw and tip back the fridge boy gotta tell you one thing is really before I go I was this week I went to see a lot of movies and I love scary movies. I love them but you know they never make any sense right? Because people in the films never know they’re gonna get killed. And no matter what happens you know you hear that music it’s like I watched this one horror film and they show this woman right she decides to go out and take a drive worse than just 100 years right? Know that music they always haven’t done done to get to their car she starts driving lady where are you going? What are you doing for car breaks down the middle of nowhere so she gets out of her car Where is she going walking down the road. Here’s the shoes walking cars or passenger car passes or things flying ever right? So she goes there to get help was a dog on the porch now

Scott Edwards: 

Ladies and gentlemen, that was Lois Bromfield live on stage from the late 90s. I know you enjoyed that set. And if you’ve listened to some of our earlier podcasts, you could hear parts of sorority girls from hell, her famous bit from the 80s being read out in a shorter, tighter version. Hey, it was so nice to hear her voice. Great interview. Great set. Thanks for joining us in this week’s podcast. Stay tuned next week another great show. Hey, thanks for listening. Bye.

Announcer: 

We hope you enjoyed this episode of Stand Up Comedy you’re hosting him see. For information on the show merchandise and our sponsors, or to send comments to Scott. Visit our website at WWW dot stand up your host and emcee.com Look for more episode soon and enjoy the world of stand up comedy. Visit a comedy show room near you.

Take a look at the rest of our podcast transcriptions here.

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