“Blind Laughter” Interview & set with Alex Valdez

Alex Valdez is the only successful Blind standup comic. He worked as half of O’Brien & Valdez, a very successful comedy team that worked all over the Country. Alex is totally blind, and yet he not only earned lots of laughs, he went on to train members of the FBI, CIA, and NASA about how to work with the handicapped. An amazing career…listen to a great story and then laugh with the closing comedy set by O’Brien & Valdez, Live on Stage.

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Podcast Transcript:

Announcer: 

This is another episode of stand up comedy, your host and emcee, celebrating 40 plus years on the fringe of show business, stories, interviews and comedy sets from the famous and not so famous. Here’s your host and emcee Scott and words.

Scott Edwards: 

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to this week’s show. We have something totally different for you all the way from Indiana. This comic is one of our headliners from back in the 80s and 90s. At laughs Unlimited, but it wasn’t a solo, he was part of a duo act. And what makes him extra unique is not only is he a very funny guy and a great guy, but he happens to be totally blind, and has had decades of entertainment history as a blind entertainer, which I think makes him very unique. But like I said, he’s funny and nice. Let’s talk to him, ladies and gentlemen is Alex Valdez. Welcome to the show. crowd goes nuts. Oh my God, have you?

Alex Valdez: 

Oh my gosh, I haven’t ever heard applause like that in years.

Scott Edwards: 

Well, I was gonna say something snarky, but I won’t. Hey, good to have you on the show. Alex, we haven’t talked in a couple decades. But I have great memories of you. And Jim O’Brien, we should explain to the audience that Yeah, I knew you as O’Brien and Valdez, which was a comedy team that came to me in the mid 80s. And was a headliner from right off the bat. But I want to kind of catch the audience up on where you got started. Because being totally blind. It hadn’t been a little bit interesting. ending up being a stand up comic, can you give us the short story on that?

Alex Valdez: 

Sure. I started doing stand up in in the spring of 1977. And of course, you know, back then everybody started out at the Comedy Store in the improv in LA and, and that’s where I started and, and then, about a year or so, after I started at the store, and a Club opened in Orange County, California, where I was born and raised, called the last stop. And I started emceeing there a lot. And that’s really where I cut my teeth and learned the craft and learn the art of comedy. And, you know, Scott, you you mentioned that Jim and I came to you and in the 80s, the mid 80s. But my very first experience with laughs Unlimited, it was when I was a solo lap. And I came up there and I believe 82. And I was the opening that for Are you ready? Here was the lineup. I was the opening that. And the hugging was the feature app. And Rodney Kenny was the headliner.

Scott Edwards: 

Wow, what a great memory. I feel bad. I didn’t have that in my notes. You know, I’ve gotten so I have a lot of my old booking books and I go through them. But I’m not focused so much on the opening acts I’m trying to. I’m focusing on the headliners in my memories are all about you as a comedy team. So I apologize. But that’s fascinating. You came up in 82 as a solo act and worked with two great guys, Andy Huggins and Ron Kenny. Very funny acts. Were you friends with one of them? Is that what brought you in?

Alex Valdez: 

Well, I knew them both from the Comedy Store. And of course, Ronnie was a headliner at that point of the game. And he, Ronnie and I just hit it off. Great. And of course, Andy and I hit it off of knowing each other at the store. And Ronnie, talk to you and you gave gave him the green light. And he brought me up as the opening act. And it had it had to have been an 82.

Scott Edwards: 

What a generous. What a generous club owner and Booker to just let him bring somebody

Alex Valdez: 

it was it was very generous of you.

Scott Edwards: 

Well, you must have done well, because you stayed around. So when did you and Jim O’Brien become a comedy duo?

Alex Valdez: 

We teamed up in 84. So, you know, so I did some I did a little bit of road work in the early 80s. I Dunlap took me to Austin, Austin, Texas. And, you know, I O’Brien and servera actually took me on the road for the very first time in May of 81. And so I was doing some road work, you know, open For some guys, and, you know, you know, back in the early 80s, went to crackers in Indianapolis in 83. And then Jim and I teamed up in the summer of 84, spring or summer of 84. And now we just went from there. Well,

Scott Edwards: 

let’s, let’s backtrack just a little and explain to the audience a couple, one obvious thing, that being a blind entertainer, it certainly facilitated bookings, when you could travel with somebody you knew and trusted, somebody that would not mind guiding you through life, a little bit in a unique and strange world. So traveling with somebody new from the store, or some of the some of these acts that you made friends with, is really crucial and helpful when you’re a blind entertainer. And then two, we didn’t explain to the audience because I wasn’t on top of it. But your partner Jim O’Brien was with a different comic and a comedy duo called O’Brien and servera. And they had actually worked my club a couple times. And then we, the way I recall it, as Vera said, Hey, I don’t want to do this anymore. My future is not in comedy. And then the next thing we knew, it was O’Brien and Valdez, and you guys were terrific together. And I think stronger than O’Brien and Cervera. I don’t want to step on any toes. But that was my personal thinking. Did Jim approach you about being his partner?

Alex Valdez: 

Yes, he did. Yes, he certainly did. And I want to talk about a couple of things that you brought up there. Number one, yeah. JIMMY AND KENNY were together for about 11 years. Oh, yes, they had some really strong road experience stay open for a lot of they became very, very popular on the college circuit. You remember back in the late 70s and early 80s. Colleges were booking comedians, right and left to do concerts. And they also booked them to open for major rock bands, you know? Right, right. So so JIMMY AND KENNY, they did a lot of that in the late 70s and early 80s. And then you’re right. And he decided to, you know, jump out of comedy. He had had enough I think of the road and everything, and maybe Jimmy and then yeah, thank you. Thank you. And, well, for all the comics that listen to your podcasts, they caught it. They’re there. They’re rolling around on the floor right now. So and then Jim approached me. And Jim really, honestly approached me, he told me later that he said, You know, I’m a headliner right now. And if I go back to being a solo act, I’m gonna step back and have to be a feature or an opener for a while. And I don’t want to do that. But if I team up with a blind guy, that makes the team pretty unique, and we can step right into headlines. So at that time, I was just an opening act. And, you know, every now and then I featured so I said, Yeah, let’s do it. So we really did.

Scott Edwards: 

Yeah, you guys were good. But there was some marketing thought behind it. Jim was trying to maintain his success path as a comedy duo in needed somebody Phil, Kenza, Vera’s position, and because you guys had already worked together, he was pretty aware of you and who you were, because let’s be honest, for the podcast audience, if you hadn’t thought about it, when you’re a comedy team, that’s actually more stressful than a marriage, because you’re not only sharing so much of your lives and being blind just makes it exponentially harder. But still, it’s it goes beyond the relationship because it’s also a business relationship. And comedy teams don’t historically last that long. Obviously, there’s a few that have done really well, you know, Laurel and Hardy and some of the classics. But yeah, in the modern comedy age, there has not been a lot of comedy Duo’s, that lasted very long because of the difficulties. And you and Jimmy made it last. I didn’t realize it went till 2013. That’s a long time.

Alex Valdez: 

Yes, we went about 30 to 33 years. So you’re you’re absolutely right. We lasted longer than you know, probably most marriages in LA So, and you know what, and Scott, I appreciate you saying that, that we were a strong team, and that we were good, because when we finally found our rhythm, and it took a while, it took a while to find it, when we found our rhythm, I’ll tell you what I would put us up against any headliner, you know, we just, when we find quick, and it took time, it took time to write that material and find it and find our rhythm. But it got to the point to where Jimmy and I, when we were on stage, you know, he could say, two, three words. And I knew exactly where he was going. And vice versa. And it was, it was a lot, a lot of fun. I mean, I don’t think I ever would have had the opportunity to go to places play the clubs, do the do the traveling everything. If I hadn’t teamed up with Jim, I give Jim a lot of credit.

Scott Edwards: 

He was I think, I think that it’s, it’s safe to say that both of your careers went farther as a comedy team than you might have gone as a solo act. And even though Jim had a great sense of humor, and a good writing history, you being a part of the act was a novelty was a marketing tool. But then you also you you put it out there on stage. And it always worked. And I think that, like you said connection that you guys made was felt by the audience, and in helped create the atmosphere that made your comedy sets even stronger. So I think that’s interesting. From I kind of hinted how difficult it was, do you want without getting too negative? Is there some of the aspects of being a comedy team that are extra difficult? And you know what, I’ll give you a starting place for a comedy team. Every time you’re booked, you’re splitting the money, you have twice as much travel cost, and you’re splitting the money. So financially, it’s more difficult right off the bat, right?

Alex Valdez: 

Yes. And that that was without a doubt that you know that that is the biggest challenge for a comedy team. Because if you remember that back in the 80s, you know, club owners were paying headliners, good money, good money, you know, and a lot of times, they were picking up travel and things like that. And, you know, when with a comedy team, sure, we were getting headliner money, but we were splitting it, and then there was double the airfare and depending on the accommodations for the week, you know, you know, sometimes we would ask for a hotel for one of us. And so we did, it became it became from that from the business aspect of it that like that’s the thing that I would say was probably the biggest challenge was the business side.

Scott Edwards: 

Yeah. And the personal side, a funny bit that Jim used to do, he’d bring you out on stage and introduce you as his blind comedy partner. And he would tell the audience and look at this amazing $1,000 suit he’s wearing I got him. And yeah, and the joke was that you didn’t know what you know, he had, he had bought the clothes, so you didn’t know what they were. And he was like, making money on the side on it. I thought that was a really funny poke at the situation that you let the audience’s in on?

Alex Valdez: 

Well, the thing we had, the thing we learned early on, was that there was no way we could get away with hiding the fact that I was totally blind. You know, there was no way. So we had to address it right? From the get go. But we didn’t want to hammer them over the head with it. So we would start out, you know, by doing some blind stuff up front. And then we finally got to the point to where we could just do straight stand up camera, right. In fact, you know, comedy,

Scott Edwards: 

and I think that’s, I’m interrupting and I apologize, but I think that’s right. It’s smart. Because I remember clearly that between the outfit you were wearing that he said he bought you in the next bit was you did that kind of urban high speed handshake where it had like 10 different moves. And those two things, not only impressed the audience that you guys were working closely as a team, but effectively pointed out that you were blind. But then like you said, a lot of the material moving past those first few minutes on stage, we’re just straight stand up, but it wasn’t about you being blind.

Alex Valdez: 

Right. And and if you’re into that, and the joke was The joke was that I would actually say, and I was like a pleasure to be here tonight, and I’m so happy wearing this brand new tuxedo that my partner bought for me. And then of course, he gives that that looks to the audience like, hey, you know? Yeah, he was. Yeah, exactly. And then he says, a course partner, I got to cover, you know, yeah. Yeah. And, and then you’re right, we would do that handshake. And what that took away from the, it took, it took the fear away from the audience. So no, no, because that handshake was very physical. And I actually and we would actually, at the very end, been around, and then floppies, and then high five. So it gave me an opportunity to be physical on stage. And the audience. Oh, okay. Okay. Yeah, these guys are okay. This blind guy, he knows how to function. You know, and, and it took the it took that fear out of the audience watching us.

Scott Edwards: 

Yeah, they could accept even some trouble. Yeah, they can accept you as a peer comic, you know, exactly. I’m gonna digress just a second I know of we all know of blind musicians that have had great success. But I can’t recall another blind comic. Are you the only one there must have been somebody?

Alex Valdez: 

Well, you know what, there was a couple of other guys that that in different parts of the country that did some stand up that were totally blind, but never had the longevity and never made it the headline step. As a matter of fact, as a matter of fact, Scott, you told me one about a blind guy that you hired at birdcage that was an opening act, and his name was Mike something. And he came on stage with his guide dog. And he told jokes. He did. He did some stand up, but also played the saxophone.

Scott Edwards: 

Wow, you ever grounded? You know? I’m feeling a little stupid right now.

Alex Valdez: 

When we finish this interview, you’re going to wrack your brains on that one.

Scott Edwards: 

Yeah, exactly. You know what, Alex, you open the door. I mean, because working with you and went so smoothly, you were always a professional. My staff always enjoyed working with you and didn’t mind at all, helping you or getting you around whatever was needed. It was so funny. I was talking to my bride Jill, about this upcoming interview and she has memories of you know, you and Jim didn’t spend 24/7 together sometimes out the show, Jim would get a hook up with a date or do something want to go out drinking or something. And Jill remembers driving you back to the condo and sharing stories with you very fondly. And I think that who you were personality wise, helped your success out away from LA where you you know, it was kind of your home base?

Alex Valdez: 

Well, Scott, I really do appreciate you saying those are very kind words, and I truly take them to heart. And please tell Jill thank you for her kind memories. i You’re absolutely right. Jim and I did not spend 24/7 I traveled I would meet Jim at at the get. I traveled I learned how to just travel on my own. Across the country, week to week, just me and my cane. Wow. And because I’ve always been a very independent blind person. I’ve always I have good good mobility. And, you know, I I never had any fear of being out there on my own. Never did.

Scott Edwards: 

That’s That’s amazing. I did think you guys always traveled together. So what you’re saying is other than the the new Tux that he bought you wink wink nod nod. Nobody took advantage of your situation.

Alex Valdez: 

No, no, I was, you know, stop when I look back on it, man. You know, I had an incredibly blessed career. The people that I met the people I worked with, you know, it’s just, it’s invaluable, truly is. You know, one of my very first, my very first acting coach was Pat Merida. Oh, yes. My very first acting coach was Pat Marieta. Pat looked at a videotape of Gemini in in 1984, about six months after we were together, because we thought we were ready to audition for The Tonight Show. And pap looked at our tape and said, You guys are close and close to being ready. And we were just We were devastated man, you know, oh my God, what do you mean? Happening goes, you guys need to go out on the road for five years and get tight? And he was? He was absolutely right. Absolutely right.

Scott Edwards: 

You know, that’s good advice. I mean, it’s difficult to swallow. But we all know that stage time is what fixes or destroys everything that you add makes it right, you have to have that stage time. And that experience, as with any career, it’s all about doing it. It’s not about talking about it. And right, you getting a chance to, like he said, tighten up the act and get that relationship as strong as you did, obviously, would have benefits for you down the road and open up opportunities. Why don’t you share with the podcast audience? Some of the things that you and Jim may have done that I’m not aware of, let’s say after the 80s and headlining at my club, what other doors open for you?

Alex Valdez: 

Well, you know, we were, you know, I would probably say at the peak of art, really, I really look at the peak of O’Brien and Valdez, his career probably in 1990 9192. And we were still working for you at the time. Yeah. Came through your club. And, you know, we were out on the road all the time, then. And then after that, you know, a couple years later, as as clubs started to close, and the economy was changing, Jim and I knew that we needed to diversify and do some different things. individually. Jim, started doing some acting and took some acting classes and had a couple of small parts, and a couple of soap operas. And I stepped into the arena of motivational speaking and corporate training. And did that from about 96 to 2008. Probably Wow, and traveled all over the country by myself. In 1996, I got my very first guide dog. Yes. And when Jim and I would work together, after I got my guide dog, we would bring the dog on stage. And this dog was so good Scott, and, and you know, and so well trained, that that we would come on stage, I would put her in a down at the very back of the stage. And I put her in a down, and she would stay there for the entire act and never move. And of course, we do some jokes about her. You know, Jim, go, this is this is Aleksey, wonderful guide, dog Rocha. Not only is she a big dog, but she’s also a drug sniffing dog. So if you got it, throw it up here.

Scott Edwards: 

That’s funny. You know, I never saw that you guys must have moved on from laughs unlimited. And by then, yes, I ever saw the guide dog on stage. But that’s hilarious. And I think that that would open up some pretty easy material. So that it just adds to the act. I think that was smart.

Alex Valdez: 

Yeah, then we became a trio. And

Scott Edwards: 

yeah, did you get extra pages? Right, Alex? You didn’t get extra pay? Right?

Alex Valdez: 

Well, I didn’t but Fabryka got more treat Roca got more treats. So you know, it was but but it was incredible. You know. And so anyway, so I got my first guide dog and from 1996 to about 2002 became a, I did a lot of the training that I did was a lot of I did a lot of training and disability awareness, attitude etiquette in the workplace. The ADEA has just come in to Vogue in the early 90s. And so a lot of corporate and a lot of government agencies were looking for trainers and diversity. And that was my focus. And I was a regular trainer for the FBI and the big and I’m not making this up, Scott. Honestly. I was a trainer for the FBI, the CIA, I did some work for NASA. I did some work for the NSA and just did a lot of work for the intelligence community in DC. And actually all over the country.

Scott Edwards: 

Oh, fascinating. That’s just don’t have No, I was just gonna say that’s fascinating and incredible, that you’re right when the whole Disabilities Act came around, everybody was kind of knee jerk reacting to it and trying to figure out how to move forward. And here they had an experienced entertainer that was comfortable in front of crowds able to share his wisdom and viewpoint on the matter. Did comedy come into play? Were you able to make it humorous? Or Oh?

Alex Valdez: 

No, well, it was both. It was a, it was a very serious subject, but I made it very funny. And that was from the years of experience on stage and making people laugh. Because I learned, you know, Scott, I learned really early in life. Actually, in the third grade, I learned that if I could make people laugh with me, at my blindness, people became very comfortable. And then people would accept me. And I learned that in the third grade,

Scott Edwards: 

wow, that’s a great lesson to pick up at an early age, it’s not hard to see how that would have carried you through a lot of situations, through childhood and into adulthood, that we’ve heard from other comics that grew up in tough neighborhoods where everybody was in a gang or just just tough. And by having a sense of humor, you could bond with people and deflect difficult situations. And I think utilizing your humor to help you with this handicap really was smart, and obviously worked out to your benefit. So congratulations on that. I can’t wait to share with Jill about your your toes in the intelligence community because she is a intelligence analyst for the government. Really, she Wow, she works. I can’t say cuz I’d have to kill you. But she does. She does some pretty high end investigatory work for all the agencies you mentioned and more. And the fact that training on that, well, we’ll maybe we’ll talk about it after the podcast, but it was definitely interesting that you did that. So you went from comedy duo stand up comic to inspirational speaker and you did some training. And I think it’s great that you’re able to utilize your years of stage experience and your sense of humor, to make yourself a success in those fields. That’s really something to be proud of.

Alex Valdez: 

Thank you. It was a lot of you know, it was it was very, it was a lot of fun. You know, the FBI and the CIA were two of the toughest organizations to work for. Because these people are just so damn serious.

Scott Edwards: 

Right? You know,

Alex Valdez: 

I remember doing a, I actually was out at Langley doing a training for the CIA. And I remembered that in the beginning of my training, I always wanted to know who was in the room. And so everybody would go around and introduce themselves and what what department they worked in. And there were three people in the back that all they gave was their first name. And, and so I picked up on that. And I said, Hey, I said, Listen, I said, there in the back. I said, Patrick, I said, you only gave me your very all you did was tell us your first name. You didn’t say anything else can you? Would you like to, you know, fill in the blank stare? And he said, I can’t. I’m not even here.

Scott Edwards: 

That’s funny. Well, yeah, it’s an interesting world. Well, Alex, what a great treat to catch up with you and find out how you’ve survived and succeeded as not only a blind, unique blind comedy entertainer, but also just period Forget being blind just as an entertainer what a great success. You’ve been starting from the communist stage and ending up in being a trainer and inspirational speaker. I think that says a lot to who you are and your personality. I know you now live in Indiana with your bride. You staying busy these days are any anything on the horizon you’re working on?

Alex Valdez: 

Well, what I’m doing now, Scott is occasionally I’ll go down to crackers and or, you know, or Mortiz the clubs down here and occasionally I’ll do an open mic night. You know, just for fun, right? Just for the heck of it. You know, just for fun. And my wife is the executive director of a nonprofit here in Anderson and And five years ago, she said, You know, I want to do an annual fundraiser for my organization. And I said, Okay, what do you want to do? And she said, I want to do a night of clean comedy called stand up for kids, because her organization works with, works with kids. And, and I said, Okay. And she said, Would you be able to reach out and find people from that headline that you work with and bring them in as headliners and do a clean show? And I said, Sure. And that’s what we’ve done. For the last five years. We have a fundraiser every September. And it’s an awesome comedy. And I am see that oh, that’s great.

Scott Edwards: 

What’s the name of the organization? Let’s plug him because this is heard all over the world.

Alex Valdez: 

Well, it’s called tick tock is her organization. She is a, she is the executive director of a child advocacy center. And what they do, Scott is they are the go between. For children, when there is suspicion of abuse, could be sexual abuse, physical abuse, neglect, or the children have witnessed the violent crime. My wife and her staff interview those children, where they only have to be interviewed once. And then it is on a DVD for law enforcement, prosecution and Department of Child Services.

Scott Edwards: 

Wow. So that’s exciting and valuable, or tell her to keep it up. And we’re proud of her. That’s awesome.

Alex Valdez: 

Thank you. I will. The other thing, Scott is I and I don’t know if you remember this. But in in 1991. I got sober. Because you remember how I used to drink?

Scott Edwards: 

Well, you were running around with Jim you. It was a competition. Let’s let’s be honest, Jim has the reputation. You paled in comparison. Jim O’Brien was professional. But that’s great that you got sober. Did you turn that into something?

Alex Valdez: 

Yes, I did. You know, you know, as we sit here today, I have 29 years of continuous sobriety. And now what I do is, I work with people in addiction. I am a treatment counselor. And I work with people in addiction.

Scott Edwards: 

Wow. Yeah. You just keep giving and giving that is so

Alex Valdez: 

thank you so much. Well,

Scott Edwards: 

you’re a nice guy. We knew it back then. I’m not surprised that it is the fact that you have taken that aside from having a disability, you have just been a great man and been able to share positive things on several levels. And I think that that’s commendable. And I know that having your original start on stage and interacting with the audience, and being funny, helped get you where you’re at. But blind or not, you really took it to a great place. And that’s exciting to hear about. Thanks so much for sharing that.

Alex Valdez: 

Thank you. You know, Scott, before we wind up this, this podcast, this episode, you know, I was talking with a fellow comic the other day, and he said, Well, what, whatever got you interested in in being sunny? And I said, wow, my, when I was nine years old, there was an organization in Los Angeles called the foundation for the junior blind. And they were a service organization that would, you know, do things with blind people that would take them to different events, and they offered, you know, classes and different things like that. And one summer, they took her to the Greek theatre, and this was in 1963. They took us to the Greek theater and the headliners. At the Greek theater that night, were the musical group, the Christine minstrels, but opening for them was Woody Allen. Ah, really? Yeah.

Scott Edwards: 

You got to hear Woody Allen live on stage. How incredible.

Alex Valdez: 

And I was sitting in the audience. Now 99% of his jokes went over my head.

Scott Edwards: 

Cerebral right.

Alex Valdez: 

Yeah. But he was I was sitting there Scott. And I remember listening to this Greek theater, everybody laughing and I thought, Wow, this guy is on stage, and he’s making all these people laugh. This is so cool. And that was my first experience with stand up comedy experiences. And a great story. Woody, Woody, signature piece at the time, was the story piece about I shot the movie. I shot a movie. And and it was, I could understand that bit. Because it was it was a story. And it was so descriptive and so vivid. And I actually remember laughing at that bit. And that was my first introduction to stand up. And I said, in many, many interviews, people have asked me, you know, where did you get your sense of humor. And Scott, I got it from my father. My father was a, and I just lost my father about a month ago. And thank you. And well, he had a hell of a run for 90 years. But But my dad was always the wife of the party, telling Joe, he was a great joke teller. And I remember as a kid, you know, watching him at our house when he would win by mom and dad would throw a big party. You know, how people just gravitated to him. And he would tell stories and jokes and people were just laughing their butts off and, and that’s where I learned. That’s how I that’s, that’s where I got my, my sense of humor and my my big personality. For my dad.

Scott Edwards: 

That’s awesome. Alex, you got your sense of humor from your dad and your inspiration from Woody Allen, what a great start. Well, I’ll tell you what, what I’m going to do Alex is I have some material of you with Jim O’Brien. So ladies and gentlemen, we really appreciate getting some of Alex’s time and catching up on his life and career in stand up comedy. But we’re going to share some of that with you. We have a stand up set with a few minutes of great material by the comedy team of O’Brien and Valdez. So sit back and wait for that. Hey, Alex, thanks so much for doing this today. I really appreciate all you’ve accomplished in being able to share that with us.

Alex Valdez: 

Scott, thank you. And Scott, thank you for all that you have done. And all you did for comedians, for comedy, you know, laugh was, was in a room, it was always considered in the comedy amongst us comedians, in the community, we knew it as, as an a club, and a club to work, you know, and a lot of people aspired to work your room, and I just have so many great memories of working for you. And I just am so appreciative for all the opportunities you gave us. So thank

Scott Edwards: 

you. You’re welcome. And we it was mutually beneficial.

Alex Valdez: 

And thank you for just keeping the comedy and the laughter dough is all about man. Well, it’s all about

Scott Edwards: 

That’s right. And let’s do that with this podcast. So thanks, Alex. Leave gentlemen. Sit back and enjoy some great comedy by the comedy team of O’Brien and Valdez

O’Brian & Valdez: 

people how many Irish people got here tonight? Raise your hand he’s blind right over here by man I don’t mind people understand was me he Hey, English English. They’ll see Irish people walk into Walmart I got Daniela LepreCon bastard kids got our families together. Yeah. Had a big thing yesterday for their brains and but this is Oh interesting. Oh, it was a great day dinner. We had corned beef and cabbage taco Yeah. We also had some tamales but his family they forgot to take off the corn. They’ve been regular ever since. And his cousin crunchy chewy. Guys, a bookies. Always a magician. He’s a sports agent bookie tattoos all over Domino’s. Come on, come on. You know that He’s a family man likes to say close to home. He’s got to he’s got an ankle bracelet. You can’t leave I’m finding that a guy’s trying to sell me velcro like I’m an idiot Jim Jim he said Barco he was telling you about his bowties He has a beautiful boat calls her the hula Caesar Julius Caesar Julio was he Julius J? Liu s Julius CJ you who you want to Catholic you got the letter J. What is J? J is h h is that a J C? C instead of JH he said a jet What do you use j instead of y? I want to know why what’s Why are again? Butter why instead of J oy instead of J Yes vn now we’re on a sports channel bn is being what is why don’t know what’s Ks, je to catch fish. Fish, big ones, huge bouquet. Chalabi? I don’t know. The bass is beautiful.

Scott Edwards: 

Ladies and gentlemen, that was the comedy team of O’Brien and Valdez. And we’re so excited that we had the opportunity to talk to Alex today. And we hope you enjoyed that and the set. Ladies and Gentlemen, thanks for listening to the podcast. Be sure to share and rate review whatever you want to do. We’re going to be here next week. Bye.

Announcer: 

We hope you enjoyed this episode of Stand Up Comedy your hosting MC. For information on the show merchandise and our sponsors or to send comments to Scott. Visit our website at WWW dot stand up your host and mc.com Look for more episodes soon and enjoy the world of stand up comedy. Visit a comedy show room near you.

Take a look at the rest of our podcast transcriptions here.

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